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Thread: Your ideas/input requested for planning a garage

  1. #1
    Nova Scotia,Canada,Earth Blue's Avatar
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    Default Your ideas/input requested for planning a garage

    I'm starting to plan a garage that I will build this summer. It will be a separate building on my lot. I am thinking interior of 36'w X 24'd X 10'h.

    I plan to use it for work and restorations and maybe some "on-the-side" minor repairs and maintenance for supplemental income down the road.

    I'd appreciate any suggestions and input to help me to "do it right the first time"

    Everything from number of doors, height of ceiling, i beams over head, floor tie-dons for straightening, ventilation, insulation, lighting, layout, storage, etc. would be helpful.
    There is scarcely anything in the world that some man cannot make a little worse, and sell a little more cheaply.
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    Rust Free'ish zKars's Avatar
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    First rule. You cannot build it too big. You can build it too high however (waste of heat and space) so consider a second story, at least internally have an enclosed "upstairs". Oh, and a bathroom.... And a fridge.. And microwave. And a couch.

    Oh hell, just move out there. As soon as the last kid moves out, I'm moving into my garage and gutting the house to make it the "shop". Haven't shared that little idea with the boss yet....
    -----------------------------------------
    Jim
    73 240Z HLS30 149331
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    Blue,
    My main shop is 27x 26 inside with 10' ceilings. It is basically a basement room with a concrete ceiling. It has large steel beams that run across the shop and I have a beam trolley I can move from beam to beam. Could be used to pull chassis and engines if needed. In your case a good engine hoist or an A frame on wheels would be much better. For your part of the world good insulation would be great. The 2 feet of snow on your Z suggest a good heater would also be a must. I just picked up a closed combustion heater from Northern tool like this but I only bought a 40,000 btu
    http://www.northerntool.com/shop/too...6365_200316365
    Closed combustion so no fumes and safer for solvents, etc. I would frame the walls of your shop out of 2x6 studs with r-19 insulation and put atleast r30 overhead. If your shop is pretty well insulated it will be easier to use and if you do any painting it has to stay in the high 60's to low 70's just cure the paints. This was a problem for me this past winter. Put lots of lights up. I have 2 tube t-8 flourescents in my shop. I believe I have 18 2 tube units. It is nice and bright and makes work much easier. I have outlets spaced every 3-4' all the way around the walls. So I can plug in tools or lights with as few cords as possible. Plan on a large air compressor eventually and pipe it into your shop. Mine is outside, but you may have to keep it inside because the oil may get too cold and freezing condesate might be a problem too, as seperate room or closet could help with damping the sound. I am piping my air in copper. The larger the better becuase it reduces water in the air because it has time to come out in the water traps. A cheaper alternative is PEX line. Don't used PVC or CPVC. When it does finally give out it makes scrapnel. The oil in the compressed air also makes it brittle. As for tie down points I thought about that, but I don't know exactly where I would want them and I wouldn't want to have them in the way all the time. One alternative would be to drill them in after the fact. Hammer drill an overly large hole and epoxy (Hilti or similar) a female threaded couplings into the slab to match the bolt holes on a say a D ring bracket. It could then be bolted to the floor when and where needed and removed when not in use (use fine thread bolts). Some of the concrete epoxies have very high tensile strength the concrete will fail before the anchor will pull out. Also cash and room to build always limits the size of your shop. I have a VW in the corner buried under parts and 2 cars fully disassembled. My shop at this point is not nearly big enough for that. So bigger is better if you can afford it. Shelves, cabinets and tool boxes also help alot. I have bought some and built some. Some place dry and relatively warm in which to do major projects make them much more enjoyable. As well as the neccessary things that need to be done when its cold outside and hitting your hands hurts.
    Hope that helps,
    Charles

  4. #4
    Registered User 5thhorsemann's Avatar
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    Watch the commercial auction sights and local scrap yards if you are looking for steel beams. I got the steel for my last shop at maryland recyclers, paid scrap price at the time + 10 %. Got a 30 foot 8 inch I beam and two 12 foot 8 inch beams for under $500 delivered to my house. Made it posable to create a clear span interrior, nothing in the way. Also, run the biggest electrical service you can, that way you won't be limited to smaller compressors and welders.

    Also, don't skimp on the lighting, go HID! I put flourecent fixtures in only to replace them with HID a year later, had to rewire everything. The HID's light the place up ten times brighter. And BTW, paint the walls ceilings and floor as close to white as you can, better for lighting.

    Another thought, put pull pots in the floor when you do the original pour. use 36" X 8" sonotubes with 1/2" rebar and 1' shanks. This was another after thought that was a pain in the butt, and a real mess to install after I monved in. But they make body and frame repairs a whole lot easier.
    Last edited by 5thhorsemann; 03-28-2011 at 05:20 AM.

  5. #5
    Registered User Gary in NJ's Avatar
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    My garage is 36x24 with 11 foot high ceiling. I have three garage doors and a 3' wide entry door. It's fully insulated. My suggestions:

    - Have several outlets in the garage for compressed air and at least one hose on a real. If the garage is attached to the house, put the compressor in that basement (or the second story of the structure) so you don't have to listen to it cycle.

    - Put 115VAC and 220VAC in the garage. Have an outlet 8' in the ceiling from each garage door. This will allow you to 1) install electric garage door openers and 2) have electric cord reals hanging from the ceiling.

    - Have enough windows to get good natural light and free heating. Install "great" lighting in the ceiling and above the work bench(es).

    - Have more then one work bench. I have two 8' work benches & sometimes I still need more.

    - I know this sounds strange, and it's just part of my OCD, but keep the garage spotless; always. I've never lost/misplaced/forgotten anything in my garage. I have an awesome shopvac permanently installed with every cleaning attachment possible (helps keeps interior carpets clean too )

    My garage is my hang-out. When my friends come over we hang in the garage. Of course, I have a stocked fridge in the garage too.
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    Last edited by Gary in NJ; 03-28-2011 at 10:05 AM.
    Gary
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  6. #6
    Supporting Member Diseazd's Avatar
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    Plan to have one section with 12 foot ceilings for your new BendPack Lift. The best $4,000.00 investment (installed) you'll ever make! It'll also let you park another car underneath.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/1404980...7600346077563/
    ______________________________________________
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    NUTs according to wife ChrisZ's Avatar
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    And get you self one of these good DIY project

    Guys stop braggig and do as Gary, post photos

    And may i suggest you look at this as an option for your walls, i'm currently planning a project where i will use it for a 1500 sqft basement.

    Chris
    Last edited by ChrisZ; 03-28-2011 at 10:55 AM.
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    I say build as high as you reasonably can without breaking the bank-10' below truss height is NOT high enough. As stated, you may want to have an above ground lift at some point. You can always drop a ceiling grid if you need to climate control the space. Clear span is always better, and drive through access is awesome.

    Also plan on all potential sewer provisions before you pour a slab. Installing later is a huge PITA. Finally, I am a huge fan of skylights. Everything else (electrical/compressed air distribution, etc.) can be done later. Make sure there is enough space around the pool table so that the cues don't hit the walls.

  9. #9
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    Blue,

    I just built mine about 5 years ago. 25' x 40' x10' ceiling. The 25' side is the front with a double garage door (16') and a 36" walk in door. I had all the walls raised 8" when the slab was poured so that I could hose down the floor and scrub it clean without worrying about the wood rotting. I put on a barn style roof to give more head clearance on the second floor with the stairs wrapping around the back corner. I used a product called "Open Joists" for the ceiling they are preconstructed floor joists for the second floor that allow the entire downstairs to be one big open area without posts in the way.
    You cant have enough outlets and they only cost a few dollars each to add while you are wiring. Ditto for the lights, I have 5 rows of 8' double bulb fluorescent lights and sometimes its still not bright enough. Each row is on its own switch so I if I don't need them all I don't turn them on. Definitely put in a fridge and microwave. I have a stove but only use it for powdercoating. I didn't put in running water or a TV (nothing would get done!!!)
    As far as a lift they are nice but it took up too much space so I've got a gantry crane that I can use inside or roll outside if needs be. With all my tools and benches I can still fit 4 cars if necessary before it snows.
    Compressor is on the second floor and makes a big difference noise wise. All air lines are run inside the walls with steel pipe to water separators by the doors, workbench, 2 on every wall and reels in the ceiling for air, drop light and extension cord. Its about where the front of a vehicle reaches from the door when pulled in to work on.

    Jeff
    72 240Z, undergoing full restoration HLS30-73866

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    Don't forget to put some floor drains in so you can wash the car indoors.

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    I agree on tlorber, make the ceilings high enough for a lift, and with Jim that you can't make it too big. While you're at it, look at the floor requirements for a lift, because if you just pour a 4" slab with no rebar, you won't be able to install a lift and retrofitting is expensive.

    220 and 110 and air plumbed around the shop are great ideas. My shop has a NG industrial heater and it has a thermostat which stays at 50 year round. The heater will bring the shop up to 65 or 70 in about 45 minutes. Very handy, and really beats the last house I was in where I used a Mr Buddy propane heater in an otherwise unheated shop (although the Mr Buddy was much better than nothing). If I were building again from scratch I'd put some wide overhangs on the roof and a cheap table and vise out there. Sometimes you're working on something that is very messy and you just don't want to do it in the shop, so you end up in the driveway working on the ground. Not optimal.
    Jon

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    Registered User black gold man's Avatar
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    If you want to save money and help Habitat for Humanity.
    See what is available at the re store. New doors and windows,building supply's
    can be had cheap.Over the years i got some great deals. No telling what
    you might come across.
    http://www.habitat.org/cd/env/restor....aspx?place=34

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    kenz240z probably has some suggestions. He has a very nice shop, although he should have built it bigger. ;-)


    Definitely check on height restrictions. A second level for parts storage is really nice, along with bathroom, break room, r&d room.
    Last edited by Darrel; 03-28-2011 at 03:42 PM.
    things will only bother you if you let them.

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    Crumudgeon
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    13' ceilings are a minimum if you're installing any asymmetric lift and you'll need 13' of width for each bay/lift. You'll also need at least a 6" thick concrete floor with 5,000 psi concrete for a lift like that. A 12' high door is also a big plus.

    Plan a dirty area in the garage for machines that cut metal and as a place to clean cars in general. Try to position that dirty area so you won't track crap into the clean area of the garage.

    If possible put the air compressor outside in a covered shed. Plan space for a 4' x 8' free standing workbench that you can walk all the way around. More workbenches and shelving can go on the sides and figure a depth of 4' (shelving at 24" and free space at 24") to walk in front of and get to stuff stack on the shelves with a ladder.

    A commercial sink is handy along with space for a free standing parts washer.

    Don't paint the concrete floors. Use a concrete stain and lots of sealer. Insulate the roof and doors. Paint the walls white and add lights on the ceiling and on the walls about 8' off the ground.
    Last edited by John Coffey; 03-28-2011 at 05:15 PM.

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    Thought I would add a little. You can never build too large. Mine is 24' deep and 32' wide. I used a "lifted" scissor truss and created a High Bay side and a low bay side. Upstairs I have a ~16'x12' space with 6' riser walls. I could have added some more space using shorter risers but hate having to bend over to store something.

    I went ahead and wired for everything. Cable, phone, ethernet, alarm and put in a 100 amp service to handle welder and compressor. Hope to add HVAC this year since it is fully insulated. I picked up a used lift and it has been the best "tool" that I own.

    I used roll up doors so I didn't have to deal with tracks. I will disagree slightly with JohnC. I used a high grade epoxy on the floor and it reflects enough light that I rarely need light under the car when on the lift.

    I built a compressor shed and plumbed with black pipe for air. I no longer have to listen to the compressor cycle and it has been GREAT.

    I had to deal with a homeowner association so make sure you don't have any issues there. Good luck. I spent the evening in the shop swapping the diff over for the track I am headed to this weekend. I really do enjoy the shop and currently have a '70 roadster, an old Honda V-4 bike I am restoring along with the race car.

    Only drawback has been I didn't leave enough space around the lift to walk where it is close to the wall. In hindsight, I would have given up some upstairs space for a little better config downstairs.

    Excuse the mess in the photo's.

    Paul

    from the outside before I finished the inside



    Last edited by rxsleeper; 03-28-2011 at 07:45 PM.

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    Go 30' deep you will not regret it. My apartment garage is 17'X35' I haft to leave wall in back open because the side door is on the opposite side of the apartment entry. It's great you can have work bench and tools along the back with room to work. I'd also leave 5' between the wall and and last bay. I'm looking at a house that does not have a garage and needs work, the nice thing is I might pickup the property for a song and dance and would be able to take the loan out enough to build the garage, put in a kitchen and plumbing upstairs, and make the needed repairs. The house would need work, but it would fall on the historic registry with the state giving me property tax abatements.

    I think I'd put in a 40'wx30'd garage with vaulted ceiling and tall door with lift in the center bay. I'd install drains and curtains for each bay, that way I would be able to clean a car, weld do some wood work without moving all the cars. I would need to screen the garage from the street side to keep the tax abatements, but with taxes in NJ that is well worth it.

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    Default historic registry

    Make sure you will be able to build the garage. I know the registry can be very restrictive
    Charles

  18. #18
    Can't have too many cars.
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    Pretty good suggestions here. I'd consider radiant floors for heat, especially in NJ. There are quite a few DIY websites that help design your system and sell everything you need. Its much, much safer than any open flame and you can zone it to where you need it. I also agree with designing the ceiling height with the type of lift you want to use.

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    Registered User mgmoreau's Avatar
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    If you plan to use standard overhead doors and want to put a lift in, I strongly suggest having the tracks for the doors go straight up towards the ceiling. Then you will not have to worry about the door hitting the car when the lift is all the way up. I does not cost much more if you order the doors with the high clearance tracks.

    I have a lift and it is the best $2000.00 I spent. It saves your back when ever you need to work on the car, even if it is to wax or clean it. I raise the car several feet and work on the side of the car standing straight up. It makes a huge difference.

    I have a 30,000 btu Hot Dawg natural gas heater and love it. It is vented to the outside. It is cheap to run also.

    Like everyone else is saying, if you have the land, build the biggest garage you can afford. You will never regret it.

    Keep us updated and post lots of pictures.
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  20. #20
    Still plays with cars kenz240z's Avatar
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    I have a 40' X 50' shop. One side is divided into 3 rooms with 10' ceilings, and the main shop is 40' X 40' with 14' ceiling. The front room has a 4' X 8' maple top work bench, Trinco blast cabinet, hydraulic press, drill press and a bench grinder. The middle room has shelving and a 60 gallon compressor. I ran black pipe through most of the shop for air. The back room has a bathroom and a beer fridge.

    I found a stainless steel restaurant sink and have that in one corner of the main shop. Great for cleaning stuff. There is a 2 post lift with room to get around it. Extra concrete was poured where the columns bolt to the floor. Outlets are every 4 feet and are just over 4 feet off the ground so I can lean a 4' X 8' sheet of material against the wall (plywood, sheetmetal). There are a couple of 220 outlets for a welder. The main shop has 2 garage doors, a 16' door and a 8' door.

    There is a catwalk above the doors to the 3 rooms with stair access so I can get into the attic, where more parts are stored. Lighting is a combination of flourescent and high bays on separate circuits. Also have 4 ceiling fans to move air around. Walls & ceilings are painted white. There is a radiant tube heater mounted on the ceiling that keeps it warm in the winter.

    Here are a few photos, but they were taken shortly after the shop was first built. A lot of the stuff like the sink & tube heat were added afterwards.
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    Kenny P.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gregs240z View Post
    Pretty good suggestions here. I'd consider radiant floors for heat, especially in NJ. There are quite a few DIY websites that help design your system and sell everything you need. Its much, much safer than any open flame and you can zone it to where you need it. I also agree with designing the ceiling height with the type of lift you want to use.
    I was thinking that using radiant heat would be good, since the heater in the house needs replacement putting a larger furnace and running a line out to the garage would not be hard. The cost would be the deciding factor South Jersey is a lot warmer than north, and heating would only be needed about 4 months of the year. Now cooling might be something to look at that is needed about 6 months, and a radiant system can be turned into a cooling system.

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    Nova Scotia,Canada,Earth Blue's Avatar
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    Update: Finally getting closer. Finished clearing the trees and have the basic dimensions 36' wide X 40' deep. I'll start refining the plans then post here for review/input. The "hole" beside my house where it will go will be grubbed and back filled in the next few weeks. I'll complete the plans and get building permits over the winter.

    I also decided to first put down a large concrete pad with 10' X 20' shed in the back yard/forest that will hopefully be finished in the next 4 weeks.This is step 1. It will eventually expand to become the paint boot and body shop.
    There is scarcely anything in the world that some man cannot make a little worse, and sell a little more cheaply.
    The person who buys on price alone is this man's lawful prey.


    John Ruskin (1819 - 1900)



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    http://ZSportCanada.com


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    NUTs according to wife ChrisZ's Avatar
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    Phil, you need to post some pics, without photos it doesen't excist
    -73 240Z HLS30-171039
    -66 Roadster SPL311-05204

  24. #24
    Nova Scotia,Canada,Earth Blue's Avatar
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    OK I will. Where are you in Denmark?
    There is scarcely anything in the world that some man cannot make a little worse, and sell a little more cheaply.
    The person who buys on price alone is this man's lawful prey.


    John Ruskin (1819 - 1900)



    ZCars in Eastern Canada seaport ready for shipment to Europe

    http://ZSportCanada.com


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    NUTs according to wife ChrisZ's Avatar
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    Copenhagen for the most, i have 3 places, any specific reason for asking or just curious ?

    Chris
    -73 240Z HLS30-171039
    -66 Roadster SPL311-05204

  26. #26
    Nova Scotia,Canada,Earth Blue's Avatar
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    My fav.city on the planet so far. (Montreal is a close 2nd). I'll PM you.
    There is scarcely anything in the world that some man cannot make a little worse, and sell a little more cheaply.
    The person who buys on price alone is this man's lawful prey.


    John Ruskin (1819 - 1900)



    ZCars in Eastern Canada seaport ready for shipment to Europe

    http://ZSportCanada.com


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    Just came across something that might be helpful even at this stage in the game. Guy on another forum has a 4 post lift and he installed single tube flourescent lights on the inside rails of the lift, both sides, all the way down. You'd need to be careful when pulling a transmission or something like that, but for aligning cars or doing oil changes, etc, it lights the bottom up pretty damn nicely!
    Jon

  28. #28
    Known Zitus carrier! hls30.com's Avatar
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    I would put in a wet bay with a water heater, a dissolved solids filter, a full curtain and dedicated drainage, and seriously consider a downdraft solvent station.
    A Z is beautiful from any angle, I just happen to prefer to view from the drivers' seat!

  29. #29
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    The forum just ate my reply Here is re-do:

    Here is the current state:

    Trees removed. Just need to get rid of the brush tonight. The tractor comes tomorrow to "grub" then it gets filled next week and settles over the winter.

    36'w X 40'd floor, walls and footing goes down in the spring. It will have a 2nd floor and a pie shaped connecting room (mud room/solarium) to the house.

    I plan to restore 2 or 3 Z's a year.






    HS30 I am putting a large concrete pad and 10' X 20' shed in the back "woods". That should be complete in a few weeks.

    I may put something else on the pad that has a "down draft" and maybe even a garage door on the back of the garage to facilitate travel to the special building. It will also have white LED lights on the walls... go figure



    Another shot of the hole to fill.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Blue View Post
    My fav.city on the planet so far. (Montreal is a close 2nd). I'll PM you.
    It's a nice city i suppose, it is like everything else, you don't see it when you have it, I'm actually on my way out of Copenhagen, building on the country side, half hour drive from CPH

    And now for the PM
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    Look to be a nice lot you have there
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    Sweet S2000 Phil! I like the Silver/Red combo. Sounds like some grand plans in the works, good luck!
    2/74 260Z

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    My garage is about the same size, with a 10X40 back room. It is big enough to fit 8 Z-cars without any room for benches, or 2 '59' Cadillac's with barely enough room for a bench.

    Bonzi Lon
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    Default Update on Garage

    I've been busy the last month:



    I'm a lumberjack and I'm OK.

    Sadly I had to take down my daughter's tree house from 2003.






    The area was grubbed by a small excavator but I ended up bringing a bigger one in to finish. Rates were $70/hr for the small and $150/hr for the bigger one.





    Finishing the crushed stone.



    25'w X 24'd slab with in-floor heat. In this area of Canada, one can build a slab up to this size of 600'sq without having to do a footing and the extra inspections.
    The slab is still drying thus the Canuck-like hockey-rink look.



    I have ~ 20' to the property line on the back and 10' on the side so I can easily get cars to the back and store them.... lots of room out of my wonderful wife's view.




    Next steps: Walls and roof.

    btw this is a "shed". The garage will go next to the house... practice makes perfect.
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    Last edited by Blue; 11-20-2012 at 08:38 AM.
    There is scarcely anything in the world that some man cannot make a little worse, and sell a little more cheaply.
    The person who buys on price alone is this man's lawful prey.


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    What about insulation under the slab ?
    Last edited by ChrisZ; 11-20-2012 at 12:19 PM.
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    yup. 6 mil vapour barrier and 2" thick plain-Jane white styrofoam insulation (same stuff I used in my house 20 years ago)... works great.

    FYI The building suppliers try to push the more expensive denser styrofoam for under the concrete but the white stuff is fine. I had to move a pipe that passed through the basement floor in my house 2 years ago and after punching through , the 18 year old foam was absolutely fab under the slab... dry and thick.
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    The person who buys on price alone is this man's lawful prey.


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    I was just thinking that heated slab with no insulation would be expensive to heat, i too use the white stuff for my build, much thicker layer, i like to keep the heat inside the house, as for the density, it would be best if it was calculated to take the actual load, but we do have different building codes over here.

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    Yes, I think northern Europe and Canada have a common interest in thermally efficient designs.

    That foam in you build is very thick! I have only seen foam that thick in floating docks and in boats.

    One error that many with in-floor radiate heat do here is to omit a thermal barrier between the heated floor slab and the unheated wall. If the two are connected then the snow will melt 40cm or more from the house!!!
    There is scarcely anything in the world that some man cannot make a little worse, and sell a little more cheaply.
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    I have 13 inch below the floor, this is the basement, we build so we get close to a "zero energy house"
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    I have seen triple glazed windows in Finland. You don't mess around in your region!
    There is scarcely anything in the world that some man cannot make a little worse, and sell a little more cheaply.
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    Yes, we have that and that's what we are going to get, they also come with gas inside and the bounding edges are with plastic instead of aluminum, heavy as hell.
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    Yes plastic is less conductive for sure. I never understood the aluminum spacers and frames in windows.

    I recall a thermodynamics class where the prof calculated the ideal glass-to-glass spacing where air's insulating properties gave way to convection.... you are bringing back bad memories of unintuitive partial differential equations.... leave those to Bohr and Brahe
    There is scarcely anything in the world that some man cannot make a little worse, and sell a little more cheaply.
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    IIRC that must be 5/4 inch
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    Hey Phil, I'm a contractor.#1 what you think is big enough for a barn/shop 99% of the time is small. building a pole barn type of building will keep cost down, and you can get about an R-30 in the side walls. ceiling, in cold country 18-24 inches of blown insulation, not fiberglass, it also helps to put Mylar bubble type insulation between your trusses stapled to the roof decking, it makes a dramatic difference in heat loss/gain. No sky lights facing south you'll roast in the summer, north side only. radiant heat the only way to fly, put down 2 inch high density foam insulation,then 3/8's pex tubing on 12 inch centers 4 inches of concrete.heat with of a 40-50 gallon water or grater water heater. Ceiling needs to be 2 foot above your highest door. With the radiant heat you will have multiple thermostats set at about 62-64 F. with the thermostats at 5 foot from the floor, any more and you will sweat.

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    YOu can't work in a cold garage, grasping cold tools. No matter WHAT I had to sacrifice I'd put in radiant,in-floor heat. Hot water tubes running in the floor. Requires a boiler, and a bit more concrete work.

    With radiant heat the rest of the shop can stay cooler while the part your BODY is in contact with, the floor, fEELS warm. the sensation is just incredible. There are no drafts, no smells, just pure comfort.

    Ask anyone who's had in-floor heat intheir home or shop. They wouldn't trade it for a lift, for nothing.

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    Update. I was too slow and the weather beat me. It is roof tight but I still need to put the metal roof on it. Currently -17C and 1' of snow on the roof.

    It is warming up to +6C this evening so I may go up and shovel off the snow. It may go above zero on the weekend so I can have another go at it.

    It has in-floor radiant with 2" of foam underneath. I am looking for a propane on-demand water heater that I can mount on the wall.

    It is actually a 25'w X 24'd "shed". Once I get the metal roof on and the metal siding, I can call for a building inspection then proceed with insulation.

    In the long run it may be a cat kennel.

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    Default 1 year later

    Nearly ready to move in!

    Just need a final inspection, rain gutter, and more grubbing, drains and crushed stone.

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    The person who buys on price alone is this man's lawful prey.


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    Nice: Looks like a good place to spend the winter.

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    Hey Blue,

    Great timing having it finished before the first snow flakes fly. Looks awesome from the outside. Post some pictures from the inside.

    Here is my man cave. I wish I did not have to share half the space with the boss!! Would kill for a detached garage that would be four times the size of my current garage.

    Take care,
    Marc

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    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by Blue View Post
    Nearly ready to move in!

    Just need a final inspection, rain gutter, and more grubbing, drains and crushed stone.

    Nice shed ........!!!
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    Blue - are you doing anything special to your floor before you move in your first tool?
    Life's a journey; enjoy the ride!

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    Nice garage with great landscaping. That is the place I just want to relax and wrench on call all day

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    Chris, yes it is officially a shed My wife and I debate this all the time. the plan is to put a garage on the house but I have to wait on that so the "shed" is a short term solution.

    Mitchel, no idea about the floors yet. Any suggestions? Just focusing on the walls and ceiling. I still have to run wiring and insulate (6" studs so it will be warm. It has in-floor radiant pipes so I plan to put in an on-demand propane system but I have a vacuum tube solar water heater that will go nicely on the roof. It will work best with a tank so I may need to couple with the on-demand system. I am also going to look at a low voltage DC lighting system with solar panels charging the system. I'll also wire in conventional lighting too. Any input is welcome.

    Thanks AJ I live in 'the woods" so it is easy to build amongst mature trees. The soil here has a lot of granite boulders due to the geology (in geek speak I am on the margin of the meguma group and the south mountain batholith) so we have to deal with these beasties. I still have to move the boulder that is up above the others and there is a big one just in behind the cluster that needs to be buried. The nice thing is that the photo is a "wife's eye view" so I can hide my cars behind the shed btw the door faces north so no hot summer heat like I had in my NJ apartment garage (btw did you get that plating issue sorted where we guessed it was from the NJ heat?).
    There is scarcely anything in the world that some man cannot make a little worse, and sell a little more cheaply.
    The person who buys on price alone is this man's lawful prey.


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    Hi Blue,

    Some random ideas:

    Lots of electrical outlets

    Good sized air compressor

    Lots of lighting

    Overhead storage units which can be cranked up and down

    Air exchanger

    Cheers,

    George
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    Thanks! I forgot fans and air exchange. Good points.
    There is scarcely anything in the world that some man cannot make a little worse, and sell a little more cheaply.
    The person who buys on price alone is this man's lawful prey.


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    You need to be on GarageJournal.com asking these questions! I've been on it for years and there are a TON of good guys, experts in every section and lotsa ideas.

    Check out my thread there: E-tek's Projects

    Best of luck with the shop!
    E-tek Racing and Restorations

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    or check my Blog: www.E-tekRestorations.blogspot.com

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    Default Floor

    Mitchel, no idea about the floors yet. Any suggestions?
    I do, but it depends on the kind of slab you got, do it have a lot of gravel ? big or small grains ? color of gravel ?

    As for the insulation, i would advise you to put the vapor barrier on the studs, then add 2bys to the studs and fill in more insulation before dry wall it, that way you can pull all your wiring on the "hot" side of the vapor barrier, it's kinda hard for me to explain why in Enlgish, but it's all about not penetrating your vapor barrier and keeping it tight.
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    The slab is poured so I just need to cover the concrete.

    Thanks for the insulation, wiring, vapour barrier tips! I got it and will do.
    There is scarcely anything in the world that some man cannot make a little worse, and sell a little more cheaply.
    The person who buys on price alone is this man's lawful prey.


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    I know it's poured, i'm not that dumb the thing is, do you need to cover it ?

    The basement floor in the house i'm building is made with a mix of Sweedish granite in the concrete, grain size up to 5/8 inch, it is "sanded" down with a diamond sander, it will end up being as smooth as a babys butt and then polished with a special resin, the resin will be in the concrete and not on top of it, it will resist everything and if it get dull and scratched, just have it polished back up.

    Cheaper than tiles and you can't beat the look, to my taste, this is how it look in the first stage.
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    Last edited by ChrisZ; 10-25-2013 at 01:36 PM.
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    I used an epoxy floor finish in my floor ("color chips" I believe...). It will chip if abused but almost no chemicals will touch it. It looks a lot like the rustoleum kits but higher solids... Lots of outlets is good. I like the alternative energy approach where it makes financial sense...
    Charles

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    I love the HTC grinding. Not sure if I can find floor grinder here?
    There is scarcely anything in the world that some man cannot make a little worse, and sell a little more cheaply.
    The person who buys on price alone is this man's lawful prey.


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    Yep I learned not to plate on high humid days in NJ or take it down to the basement. I had low contact this the sight over the last 1-1.5 years the site, I bought a house from the 50's with a garage almost perfect for a lift. TO make it perfect I need to switch to a sliding door over an overhead door so I can have 24' of lift height. I bet you can guess that I understand your discretion of the region by the user name.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Blue View Post
    I love the HTC grinding. Not sure if I can find floor grinder here?
    There must be other who make this grinding stuff, maybe you can even rent the maschine, my floor is not finished yet so i can't show you the result, the total price will be less than $30 per sq meter and i didn't touch a finger.
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    Hi Blue:
    +1 on visiting the GarageJournal.com site - spend a few hours there and you'll pick up a lot of very creative ideas. Also +1 on having a polished concrete floor. Many of the major Discount Stores and Grocery Stores around here are using this now - as well as some of the Drug Stores. I was going to recommend a Race Deck floor - I love mine - but I'm not sure how that would work with a heated floor. At any rate do something with the floor before you get much stuff in there..

    On the vinyl chip floors - the most expensive, very best of them are excellent. I hear lots of problems with the less expensive, thinner vinyl chip layers etc types. Do a lot of research on that subject.

    Enjoy the process...
    Carl B.

  66. #66
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    I did a lot of research looking for a high solids floor epoxy. It is very chemically resistant but if you slide something heavy like a tranny it will scratch it right off the concrete. I etched my concrete before the first coat. If you want to grind your floor Sunbelt rentals here in the US have floor grinders for rent. They offer the stones in carbide and diamond you have to buy the stones. The latter being way more expensive and faster.
    C
    Last edited by Patcon; 10-29-2013 at 06:03 PM.

  67. #67
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    Lightbulb I used my power washer to trench in a power cable

    I had to trench in a power cable to the garage from the house.

    I used my gas powered pressure washer to cut a precise 3" wide X 18" deep trench. It was minimal work and mess. No crowbars or shovels were needed.... just a pick-axe with a broad blade.

    We have mixed till soil here so large rocks are usually problems when digging holes. With the pressure washer, I just blasted around the rock on all sides and under then I could simply reach in a pick it out.

    For initial cuts I used some pipe on the lawn to act as a straight line and guide. I used a 0 degree nozzle and made a few completely vertical cuts along each side of the pipe-guide to cut the sod and soften the soil with virtually no back spray or mud.

    You can eventually stick the nozzle deeper in the ground to feel where you cut and the soil loosening.

    I just kept passing over the line and the cuts went deeper. After ~ 6 inches of depth were loosened, I moved the guide and used a pick axe to lift and snap the small roots I came across near trees.

    As mentioned above, the big rocks were easily tackled with the pressure washer and picked out.

    The slurry of silt flowed and could easily be pulled out again with the broad blade of the pick axe.


    Enjoy if you try this. BTW it was my boss's (wife) idea





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    There is scarcely anything in the world that some man cannot make a little worse, and sell a little more cheaply.
    The person who buys on price alone is this man's lawful prey.


    John Ruskin (1819 - 1900)



    ZCars in Eastern Canada seaport ready for shipment to Europe

    http://ZSportCanada.com


  68. #68
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    That's cool. Never tried that and have been doing a lot of trenching at work lately.
    C

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