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Thread: Spindle Pin Woes

  1. #1
    Registered User Hardway's Avatar
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    Default Spindle Pin Woes

    After several weeks of rounding up tools and doing all the research I could find I decided to tackle my spindle pins. I have the rear suspension off the car so it makes things easier. I invested in an acetlyene/oxy torch setup and got a crash course in how to use it from my neighbor who is a certified welder. I built a pipe based puller that has been shown all around the net. Instead of having the all thread tapped in the middle I made an adaper that would screw on to the end of the all thread by welding a M14x1.25 lugnut to 5/8 coupling nut. I had been hosing down the pins with PB Blaster for the last few weeks and today I used my torch setup to heat up the strut tubes/hub assembly. I made sure to go slow but ended up snapping the end off one side. On the other side I heated it up longer but it snapped the end off too. Knowing there was no way to pull the pins out I got my cut off wheel and cut the pins so I could free the control arm. Now I am left with the hub assembly and the stuck pin inside. I am thinking I am going to have to take it somewhere and have it pressed out. In addition I still need to extract the broken piece of spindle pin from my adapter. So before I tackle the other pin that is still mint I wanted to see if I am missing anything. In addition I think 2 factors were possibly working against me.

    1. Even with the torch maybe I am not getting the hub assembly hot enough?

    2. My adapter is not 100% straight and thus it was not pulling the pin out exactly straight.

    If anyone can add anything to this for items I may have missed is greatly appreciated.



    08/1970 240z Series-1 #8011 - Silver, black int., 2.4L I-6, 5spd, 90% restored.
    06/1973 VW Karmann Ghia - Black convertible, 4spd, 1600cc air-cooled engine.
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    Nova Scotia,Canada,Earth Blue's Avatar
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    Maybe too much heat got into the pins and weakened them?
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    Get a drift and pound it out. You don't have to worry about damaging the pin anymore! There's nothing easy about that job.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hardway View Post
    Knowing there was no way to pull the pins out I got my cut off wheel and cut the pins so I could free the control arm. Now I am left with the hub assembly and the stuck pin inside.
    BTDT. Woof.

    Back when I went through that, I ended up drilling the old pin out of the strut assy. I've got a hydraulic press since then, and before I drilled it, I would see if I could press it out. If my press didn't have the nuts, I would take it to someone with a bigger press.

    Drilling it was no fun at all.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ksechler View Post
    Get a drift and pound it out.
    YMMV, but that didn't work for me.

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    Pounding them out with a drift will probably not work if they are too tight to pull out.

    The pounding can actually swell the ends, and make them tighter.

    They need to be pressed out.

  7. #7
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    LOTS of Heat on the out outside only. DONT heat the pin, it will expand and seize up. You need to heat the outside. That way it will expand and give you a better chance at getting the pin out.
    Dont direct heat through the cotter pin hole. Its tempting, but that will heat the pin more the the hub. You need to keep the pin as "cool" as possible otherwise it will expand and soften. Then you will only mushroom the end and make it harder to get out.

    Use a big hammer. A small hammer doesnt have the force. The more you hit it the more it will mushroom the pin. And a driving pin a little bit smaller than the spindle pin. If you dont have one big enough a 1/2" grade 8 bolt will be ok. A long one with the thread section cut off. It also has a nice big hex head which helps protect your fingers if you have lousy aim

    If you can get your hands on a press. That will make life a lot easier. I would still use heat on it and then press it out.

    Spindel pins, they can be the biggest PITA.
    Goodluck with it. Mine came out like yours, in pieces

    Chas
    Last edited by EuroDat; 02-10-2013 at 03:00 AM.

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    Registered User tlorber's Avatar
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    When you get to the other side, make sure you keep rotating the control arm back and forth as you apply the tension.

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    Please tell me you removed the center locking pin from the strut that locks the spindle pin from turning.....
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    Thanks for all the input guys. As always, this forum and its members rock! Yes, the locking pins are out. I made sure not to apply hear around the pin hole since I new it was a direct shot to the pin. Looking like a 20 Ton HF press is in my near future. I had looked at buying one to do my rear wheel bearing job but now it looks like I need one even more. If they have it in stock I am going to try and pick it up today and try again. I will post my updates once I have them.
    08/1970 240z Series-1 #8011 - Silver, black int., 2.4L I-6, 5spd, 90% restored.
    06/1973 VW Karmann Ghia - Black convertible, 4spd, 1600cc air-cooled engine.
    11/2013 Scion FR-S - Silver, 6spd, a car with the soul of a Z for the modern times.
    Restoration thread of my old '72 240z -> http://www.classiczcars.com/forums/o...1972-240z.html

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    Is a 20ton press really required? I've been eyeing up a 12 ton and its a heck of a lot cheaper than the 20ton.
    Dave
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    I had this exact same situation happen to me. I cut the pin as you did so I can separate the spindle from the control arm and took it to a local garage to press it out. To my surprise even with using the press we couldn't get the pin to come out. While the press was applying pressure on the pin we heated the outside of the spindle ALOT, almost to the point where it was starting to glow red and it finally broke free and came out.
    Goodluck with it, let us know how you make out!

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    Quote Originally Posted by olzed View Post
    Pounding them out with a drift will probably not work if they are too tight to pull out.

    The pounding can actually swell the ends, and make them tighter.

    They need to be pressed out.
    Yes, you are probably right. I take back that bad advice.

    Hardway, I will tell you a press is mandatory for the rear bearings and also helpful installing the bushings, so if you on the fence maybe you should go ahead and get it for this job and also use it on the bearings.
    Last edited by ksechler; 02-10-2013 at 06:38 PM.

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    I bought the HF 20T A-frame press a bunch of years ago. I liked the design of the A one more than their standard H frame. I'm not sure they still offer the A-frame in 20T, but I know they still have the H.

    Anyway, I used it as designed for a few years and then after getting tired of a few of it's shortcomings, I made a bunch of improvements. So, if you do get a HF press, let me know and I'll see if I can document the details of what I did to mine to make it better than new.
    Last edited by Captain Obvious; 02-10-2013 at 07:56 PM.

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    Registered User Hardway's Avatar
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    Back at it again today. I went to Harbor Freight this morning and purchased one of their 20 ton presses. I bought the 20 ton over the 12 ton version because the 20 ton was only $20 more and had much better reviews. The overall construction seems to be very good regardless of it being made in China.



    I used the bolt method as mentioned above so the press would have something to push against while pushing on the pin. I drilled a 3/8 inch hole first, used a grade-8 3/8 bolt and the pin moved maybe 1/16 of an inch while crushing the bolt. I then moved up to a 1/2 inch grade-8 bolt as recommended and it moved the pin out some more to the distance you see in the picture below. At this point I had worked at it for about 6 hours and called it a day. I need to source a dounut for the hub assembly to sit on while I push the pin out and have it be strong enough to not give under the intense pressure of the press, I was using a small piece of iron pipe scrap that started to compress. Just to get the pin to move the little that it did took all the power of the press, almost to the point where it was making me nervous. I did heat the hub assembly and was careful not to over heat it and heat up the pin. Another thing, I need a good second set of hands as wrestling the assembly in to place on the press was a job all in itself. All in all today yielded a very small victory but in reality the entire weekend feels like a disappointment. Maybe the upcoming 3-day weekend will yield better results.




    Disclaimer: to anyone reading this, if you are thinking of attempting this kind of work on your own and doubt or question your abilities please seek the assistance of a professional. This is very dangerous work and if something were to go wrong the end result would likely be very bad.
    08/1970 240z Series-1 #8011 - Silver, black int., 2.4L I-6, 5spd, 90% restored.
    06/1973 VW Karmann Ghia - Black convertible, 4spd, 1600cc air-cooled engine.
    11/2013 Scion FR-S - Silver, 6spd, a car with the soul of a Z for the modern times.
    Restoration thread of my old '72 240z -> http://www.classiczcars.com/forums/o...1972-240z.html

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    What can I say. Spindle pins were invented to give us restorers nightmares. Its probably the most dreaded job you can do on a Z. The one your got looks like it came straight from hell.
    The press looks like a good investment. You would never had flog that pin out with a hammer.
    For your dounut you could try heavy gauged steel water pipe. Use a 3/4" inside a 1" pipe or 1" in 1-1/2". That will keep in from collapsing I hope. Your using a 20ton press which can destroy just about anything in its way.
    You could also try 5/8" grade 8 bolts. They are close to 16mm so you might need to grind them done a bit to get enough clearance. Try to get them as long as possible (2" or 3" long) cut the heads of and drop them in the hole and keep pushing through like that until it comes out the other end.

    The drivers side spindle pin on my 280z kept me and my mate of the street for a hole saturday and sunday morning. I had an anvil from the next door neighbour, a couple of different lenghts 1/2" bolts and plenty of heat. I wasnt looking forward to doing the other side and the dam thing came out so easy that I could reuse it. Maybe your other pin will be easier. Cant imagine it being any worse than this.

    Dont give up on it. It seems disapointing but your getting there, just a little behind your schedule.

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    At least you got a new press for the garage.

    One thing I see missing from your pictures is lubrication. I'm sure it would help and might make the difference. And, since you have a bolt in the end you can twist the shaft to loosen it up. When I took mine out I put a mag wheel lug nut on the end and spun the shaft around while soaking with PB Blaster. That lets it get in where it can do some good, and the spinning grinds down the rust particles that are holding the shaft in.

    You'll look back on it as good times some day...
    1976 280Z, with some minor modifications

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    Nova Scotia,Canada,Earth Blue's Avatar
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    Don't forget acetone and transmission fluid 50/50mix and squirt in the centre hole and ends as you press. Use the press to work the pin back and forth to let the lubricant penetrate and make it easier to ultimately push it all the way.

    FYI:

    Source: Machinist's Workshop Magazine (April 2007)

    Pentrating oil--------Average load
    None------------------------516 pounds
    WD-40----------------------238 pounds
    PB Blaster------------------214 pounds
    Liquid Wrench-------------127 pounds
    Kano Kroil------------------106 pounds
    ATF-Acetone mix------------53 pounds (mixed 1 to 1 ratio)
    .
    Last edited by Blue; 02-11-2013 at 05:23 AM.
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    Your troubles with this job parallel my experiences.

    The proponents of the spindle pin puller devices have never crossed paths with a pin like yours. More power to 'em, but my experience has led me to believe that if the spindle is stuck so minimally that a puller device would succeed, then it's in there so loose that I would never have needed a fancy puller in the first place. Regardless of how robust the puller is...

    Make sure you have a good solid square to the direction of the pressure backing for the knuckle. Make sure you are getting the force normal to the end of the pin. Wear safety glasses, gloves, and a face shield.

    So, while I can't add any additional specific insights as to what to do at this point, I can simply provide solidarity. I feel for ya.

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    Food for thought:

    If I were in your situation I would lube up the section that you now have exposed and the inside of the other side of the strut where you pushed it through. Then I would push it back in (as long as it didn't take excessive force) and see if the pin would come out the other side. I would just keep lubing and working it back and forth the small amount you can. Eventually the lubrication will work in and you will be able to press it all the way out.

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    Thank you guys for all the encouragement and suggestions. I plan to pick up a large selection of sockets and remove the hub and bearings to make it easier to move the hub carrier around. Once that is done I am going to throw in my vice, mix up some Acetone and ATF, pour some in the top where the pin has been pushed in, and let it sit for the week, periodically checking it to see if it has drained down in between the pin and wall of the hole. I will also put some around the center of the pin too. My only fear is that the pin is in so tight the fluid may not go any where. Pushing the pin back in is not really an option as it took a lot of time and force to get it out just to where it is at. If the penetrating fluid works it might become an option but we will see.

    In regards to the doughnut I need, some heavy duty pipe fittings should do the trick. To be honest, I am pretty psyched to have the press and already using it. I have been reading about all the possibilities that can be realized with even a simple press like mine. For now though I am staying focused on the project at hand. If all goes well I will have some updates later this week.
    08/1970 240z Series-1 #8011 - Silver, black int., 2.4L I-6, 5spd, 90% restored.
    06/1973 VW Karmann Ghia - Black convertible, 4spd, 1600cc air-cooled engine.
    11/2013 Scion FR-S - Silver, 6spd, a car with the soul of a Z for the modern times.
    Restoration thread of my old '72 240z -> http://www.classiczcars.com/forums/o...1972-240z.html

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    Goodluck with. Its a good idea to leave it a while with the acetone atf mix. The pin is so tight that the fluid might not penetrate that far.
    Keep us posted. It will be interesting to see when it comes out.
    Chas

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    I agree with Ksechler. Lube the protruding end and press the pin back in then out.

    Otherwise get that sucker real hot.

    I hope i never have to do mine. I helped a friend some years back, heat, pounding, etc.
    He ended up taking them to a shop with a good hyd. press.
    Last edited by olzed; 02-11-2013 at 12:30 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by olzed View Post
    I agree with Ksechler. Lube the protruding end and press the pin back in then out.

    Otherwise get that sucker real hot.

    I agree, too.

    Chuck
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    Walmart greeter Mikes Z car's Avatar
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    Is getting the spindle pin out easier on a rust free car?

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    This makes me really glad that my pins were replaced by the idiot previous owner. They managed to leave out the locking pins and didnt bother to tighten any of the hardware, but at least it was done.

    I ended up pulling mine and coated them with some anti-sieze just in case they ever needed to be replaced.

    Good luck

  27. #27
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    Glad you are making some progress. One of my pins came out with a press and big hammer to finish the job. The other one was a PITA. The 20 ton press wouldn't budge it. I eventually drilled out the core to just outside of the locking joint on both sides which gave a good seat for a drift; heated the assembly with a MAPP torch, sprayed the pin core with WD40 to shock cool it, and then knocked the hell out of it with a big hammer. I felt like I had climbed a mountain when I drove it out.

    Good Luck

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mikes Z car View Post
    Is getting the spindle pin out easier on a rust free car?
    Seriously not gloating, but mine came out "reasonably" easy.....no press or extraction tool. Not a rust free car either. Soaked the cr*p out of them for a week with PBlaster and then drove out with a drift pin.
    Highly recommend the advice to keep spraying and moving the pin back and forth to spread the lube.
    Patience will be rewarded.
    Bart

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    About pressing the protruding portion back in... If you're going to try that, make sure you clean out the newly exposed hole portion as well as the freshly exposed portion of the pin before you press the other way. File a couple thousandths off all the exposed pin and clean out the exposed hole portion with sandpaper and light oil or WD40. I'm sure you already figured this out, but there's not much to be gained by pressing that thing back together rusty.

    After you clean off the newly exposed parts, lube up both sides with penetrant and then maybe change direction. The theory being, the direction change can help work the penetrant into places it won't wick to when everything is static.

    Good luck!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mikes Z car View Post
    Is getting the spindle pin out easier on a rust free car?
    Absolutely!

    It's not meant to be a press fit at all. The pin is supposed to slip easily in and out of that hole. That's why Datsun went through the expense of using the retainer bolt in the center of the pin. When the pin and holes are clean, the pin would (would?, could?, or should?) float and spin in the knuckle hole in the bottom of the strut housing if it weren't for the retainer bolt.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by ksechler View Post
    Food for thought:

    If I were in your situation I would lube up the section that you now have exposed and the inside of the other side of the strut where you pushed it through. Then I would push it back in (as long as it didn't take excessive force) and see if the pin would come out the other side. I would just keep lubing and working it back and forth the small amount you can. Eventually the lubrication will work in and you will be able to press it all the way out.
    I have been thinking about this method and agree with Captain Obvious post#29. You should be carefull because you are using so much force to get it moving in any direction. Pushing it back through could mushroom it and seize it up in the hub and it could make it worse. Just apply caution when/if you try this.

    IMO I think heat and pressing it out is the best bet. Even trying to get water drops on the pin to cool it might help. If its hot it will be softer and deform easier which is not what you want.

    Another method is to heat the pin red hot, let it cool off completly and then heat the hub and press it out.
    Heating the pin will expanded it. Try not to heat the hub. Cool the hub to stop it expanding. The pin can not expand in diameter so it will grow in length just couple thousands of an inch. When it cools it will shrink which could be enough to help get it out.

    Of course I'm standing on the side line giving comments. I wish you all the luck with it. One day you will be at a party and someone will say "I climb mount Everest" and you can say, "Thats nothing I took on Datsun spindle pins and I won"
    Chas

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    My apologies for the delay in an update. Last weekend I was determined to get the spindle pin out and had been letting it sit in the Acetone/ATF mix all week, periodically adding to it with a spoon each morning and evening. After about 20 minutes, 2500 degrees of heat, and 20 tons of pressure it started to see things my way. After reconfiguring my press a few times and pressure sessions it was out.




    Even with less than half of inch left to go I still needed the press to get it all the way out.




    Finally, victory was mine!




    I did a pay price for all my productivity. Mother nature dealt me a good head cold and have been getting it over all week.
    08/1970 240z Series-1 #8011 - Silver, black int., 2.4L I-6, 5spd, 90% restored.
    06/1973 VW Karmann Ghia - Black convertible, 4spd, 1600cc air-cooled engine.
    11/2013 Scion FR-S - Silver, 6spd, a car with the soul of a Z for the modern times.
    Restoration thread of my old '72 240z -> http://www.classiczcars.com/forums/o...1972-240z.html

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    Since I was pretty miserable over the second half of last weekend due to my cold I did not get anything done. Knowing the other spindle pin was waiting for me and could very well be just as difficult as the first I start feeding it some of my Acetone/ATF mix throughout the week. I figured if I could just get it to move, hopefully it would be easier this time around. For starter I would try pressing on it as a full assembly. After some promising initial results it reached a point where I could no longer keep a bolt straight on the pin due to the head mushrooming to one side. Darn!




    I also tried my puller one more time but sure enough the end broke off just like with the other pin. Out came the cut off wheel to cut the ends off and pull the control arm from the hub assembly. Followed up by half inch hole drilled in the end of the pin for the bolt sit in, 30 minutes of heat and pressure later and the pin was out! A shot below of a new pin versus the old. Good riddens!

    08/1970 240z Series-1 #8011 - Silver, black int., 2.4L I-6, 5spd, 90% restored.
    06/1973 VW Karmann Ghia - Black convertible, 4spd, 1600cc air-cooled engine.
    11/2013 Scion FR-S - Silver, 6spd, a car with the soul of a Z for the modern times.
    Restoration thread of my old '72 240z -> http://www.classiczcars.com/forums/o...1972-240z.html

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    Boat Anchor Repairman Captain Obvious's Avatar
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    What an annoying, wretched, painful, dangerous, stressful pain in the arse. Sure glad that's over.

    Have you cleaned up the bore in the bottom of the strut knuckles yet so you can see what it's supposed to feel like? A little sandpaper wrapped around a gun swab chucked up in a drill does wonders.

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    Congrats. Maybe you shouldn't have called yourself Hardway.

    I took a rat tail file to the spindle pin bore and removed the high spots on mine. There were some around the lock pin hole. Ran the pin in and out and kept knocking down the high spots until it went in easy.

    Edit - I seem to be following CO around the forum...
    1976 280Z, with some minor modifications

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    Registered User Jeff G 78's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mikes Z car View Post
    Is getting the spindle pin out easier on a rust free car?
    Not always. My '78 pins were exactly like Hardway's and my car is 99% rust free. After the standard methods failed and I cut the pins, the huge press at work still struggled to get them out. When they finally did come out, I could see that the PB Blaster failed to make it more than an inch in from either end.
    Jeff
    Northville, Michigan
    IZCC #1285
    '78 280 10:1 CR, Arizona Z Car header, urethane bushings, Tokico springs, Illumina struts, Panasports w/Hankook R-S2 225/50R16 tires, Maxima 105 amp alternator
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    Walmart greeter Mikes Z car's Avatar
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    Is the spindle pin usually replaced because it is supposed to rotate slightly as the rear wheels go over bumps but can't if it gets old and rusty? How does it affect handling or something else when it needs replacing?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mikes Z car View Post
    Is the spindle pin usually replaced because it is supposed to rotate slightly as the rear wheels go over bumps but can't if it gets old and rusty? How does it affect handling or something else when it needs replacing?
    The spindle pin should not turn. Its fixed by the cotter pin a little off from the centre. To replace the lower control arm bushes you need to remove the spindle pins.
    Chas
    5/77 280Z HLS30 403100 with some modifications
    Original colour: 305 Light Blue. The PO changed it to Red

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    Nova Scotia,Canada,Earth Blue's Avatar
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    ...and the final score is:

    Jeff:2 Pins:0

    what a game folks....see you all next time
    There is scarcely anything in the world that some man cannot make a little worse, and sell a little more cheaply.
    The person who buys on price alone is this man's lawful prey.


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    Registered User Robin's Avatar
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    Whoot!
    73' 240Z HLS30-140770
    79' 280ZX HS130-120788

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    Thanks for the compliments guys. Yes, I am very glad they are out and its over. I used my rotary tool with a rolled sandpaper bit on the end to clean up the bore inside the hole where the spindle pin was. Once I ran it through a few times it looked really good. I will know for sure once I test fit the new spindle pin. By far the best tool I learned about from this experience was the Acetone & ATF mix for a penetrating lubricant. PB Blaster cannot hold a candle to this stuff. Best off all, its super cheap to make a lot of it. I am going to find a bottle with a needle on the end so I can squirt it in to tight places.
    EuroDat and tlorber like this.
    08/1970 240z Series-1 #8011 - Silver, black int., 2.4L I-6, 5spd, 90% restored.
    06/1973 VW Karmann Ghia - Black convertible, 4spd, 1600cc air-cooled engine.
    11/2013 Scion FR-S - Silver, 6spd, a car with the soul of a Z for the modern times.
    Restoration thread of my old '72 240z -> http://www.classiczcars.com/forums/o...1972-240z.html

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    Congrats!

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    Well freaking done! Let me give you a couple of quick pointers based on some of my mistakes. First, the notch in the spindle pins is NOT in the center. Make sure you have them oriented the right way before installing. Then coat them liberally with anti-sieze compound in case you and/or the car are around in another 40 years and they need to be replaced again.

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    LH pin, in vise, full length tap tap tap - fell right out on the floor... think to myself what's the big deal..... RH one not so much, soaked 2 weeks in penetrating oil - made removal tool with bearing- no, cut pin to remove hub from LCA - BFH, no - heat - BFH, no - finally took it to welding/machine shop that specializes in directional drilling eqpt repair, left it there for a few weeks - today stopped by, was going to pick it up one way or the other, and the feller had some time... 70 Ton press!! he said it was working at about 20TON!! pushed that seized/rusty little bugger right out of there. Moral - pay the man. Only 20 Bucks - Merry Christmas to me! Can't believe what a great feeling it is. Vented.... out

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    Quote Originally Posted by Blue View Post
    ...and the final score is:

    Jeff:2 Pins:0

    what a game folks....see you all next time
    We can say he murdered the other team or he cut them to pieces.

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    Evening , I have to ask , why did u do them in the first place ? was there a pervasive issue that required you to go to all the effort and extra expense ? I asked the owner of the shop out in Surrey, British Columbia , that deal exclusively in Datsun and he replied that it would be one of the last, if ever jobs that he would want to do as the part , even after 40 years was very unlikely to make a performance difference in my Z or most any other Zs that r out there . I have followed all your threads , Hardway and it is obvious you take great detail in your resto . With all do respect , do you sometimes ask yourself if; what all you do is over the top ? I have at times fallen into the '' while i'm there '' trap , it it has been with some regret the decisions I have made . In the end it is strictly up to you what choices you make , I am just trying to understand why it all has to be changed , unless there is no other option .
    z ya
    Chris
    71-z , great for me , awesome for the parts store , hey I'm helping the local economy !

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    To change the bushings, I suppose is the primary reason...everything else just follows. I'm sure my car's original bushings are in less than ideal shape anymore, but do I want to change them? I dunno. Are replacement spindle pins still available from Nissan? From one the pics it looks like there was a brand spanking new one...or just get them from Motorsport Auto?

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    chaztg, As far as I know, the spindle pins are still available. MSA just sells the OE Nissan parts, so they are one in the same.

    fuzze, the outer bushings do degrade over time. The ones I removed from my '78 were shot. Other reasons to remove the pins would be to replace bent control arms, upgrade to adjustable arms, paint/powder coat suspension parts during a restoration, etc.
    Jeff
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    '78 280 10:1 CR, Arizona Z Car header, urethane bushings, Tokico springs, Illumina struts, Panasports w/Hankook R-S2 225/50R16 tires, Maxima 105 amp alternator
    http://www.classiczcars.com/photopos...00&ppuser=7975
    '74 260Z BRE look-alike crap can for Optima Batteries ChumpCar World Series Racing racing
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    I'll add a +1 for heat and lots of penetrating oil. I just pulled my suspension apart today and, possibly due to my z being a rust-free version as previously mentioned, both spindle pins came out without a fight by using heat on the strut body, liberal application of penetrating oil and a 2-pound hammer on a long bolt to drive them out. Not to be outdone, Karma hit back by granting me one pin with a stripped end thanks to whoever had previously fiddled with the car. I have to buy new pins anyway. Oh fortune, how you mock me...

    Speaking of which, I'll pose a related question. If a spindle pin is in good condition when it comes out, does it require replacement?

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    I don't think I would re-use a 40 year old spindle pin.
    73 240Z
    74 260Z

    Blue's collection of tech tips - A great place to look for answers
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    I am happy to see my thread is still being used as a resource to owners In regards to where to get new pins, I ordered mine from MSA as I was ordering some more parts at the same time and they actually had the best price. Was it all worth it in the end? Hard to tell since I only drove the car about 50 miles after doing all the work before I sold it. Since I was replacing everything else and I wanted to strip and paint everything I needed to get them out. The current owner loved all the work I did and the documentation and pictures helped to prove its value. If I had to do it over again I would, especially now since I have all the tools and knowledge. If anyone in the Austin area ever needed a hand with theirs I would help them out.
    Blue likes this.
    08/1970 240z Series-1 #8011 - Silver, black int., 2.4L I-6, 5spd, 90% restored.
    06/1973 VW Karmann Ghia - Black convertible, 4spd, 1600cc air-cooled engine.
    11/2013 Scion FR-S - Silver, 6spd, a car with the soul of a Z for the modern times.
    Restoration thread of my old '72 240z -> http://www.classiczcars.com/forums/o...1972-240z.html

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    If the threads are in good shape and not deformed by using a hammer, then all you should have to do is file down any knicks or deformed areas especially around the lock pin are. Then use anti seize on the pin and in the strut housing.
    things will only bother you if you let them.

    82 280zxt 4 spd auto
    73 240z--lsd, cv axles
    short throw info

  54. #54
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    OK - Just finished the spindle pins - bushing replacement (this thread helped tremendously).

    I'm glad it is over. If I had to do it again I would NOT buy a spindle pin puller. Stripped it out in about 30 seconds and wasted $60.00. Buy your spindle pins and your new bushings. Get a hacksaw (if they will not come out by hammering the crap out them) and cut them out. One you get the Lower Control Arm (LCA) separated you will need to press them out or beat the hell out of them with a drift to get them all the way removed. Once you have the spindle pins totally removed next you have to get a 1" door hole drill and drill out the rubber of your bushings. Once you get the inner collar drilled out with your door hole saw on your skill saw, go back to your hack saw. Cut your bushing housings into thirds. Once cut you can pop them out with a chisel or screwdriver.
    Once your LCA and strut housings are all cleaned up you will need to debur or sand inside your housing where the spindle pin goes back in. I used a round file 6" in my electric drill. Cleaned up the spindle pin housing on both the strut housing and the LCA. The pins are directional so be sure to put the end with the color dot facing the front of the car. Put some anti-seize on the pin, line everything up and make sure you have the pin cut out facing the correct direction for the spindle pin lock.

    Of course easily said after the fact but this has taken weeks to get the dis-assembly - destruction - POR15 - reconstruction and finally satisfaction of getting the job done.

    Hope this helps somebody out there.
    Blue likes this.
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    R180 3.9 Diff - Close Ratio 5 Speed - Toyota Vented Brake Upgrade w/ Porterfield High Performance Pads & Shoes

    1972 Datsun 240z
    HLS30-75040


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    I still haven't given up on my puller design that I've been talking about making for a few years. I finally got a section of 1" acme all thread and now I just need to actually make the tool. The small, cheap tools will fail, but the right tool, I think, will make the job easy.
    Jeff
    Northville, Michigan
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    '78 280 10:1 CR, Arizona Z Car header, urethane bushings, Tokico springs, Illumina struts, Panasports w/Hankook R-S2 225/50R16 tires, Maxima 105 amp alternator
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    The puller I used was the one from Hybrid Z that had sole hundreds................it's just no match to the frozen metal to metal from 1970 something...............naturally I used some anti-sieze lub when I slide them back into place.
    Life's a journey; enjoy the ride!

    Mitchell
    L28 - N42 Block w/Flat tops - N42 Rebello Head & Cam - Triple 40 PHH Mikuni's - Headers - Recaro Seats -
    R180 3.9 Diff - Close Ratio 5 Speed - Toyota Vented Brake Upgrade w/ Porterfield High Performance Pads & Shoes

    1972 Datsun 240z
    HLS30-75040


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    A design that spins the pin while pulling might have some benefits. When the pin is pulled straight out the rust particles can wedge in the small spaces, and the high spots can gall the points that they can't get past. Spinning allows things to find their happy place, along with doing a little grinding on the high spots, and lubing up every surface.

    I had good luck threading old mag wheel lug nuts on to each end of my pin and spinning the pin while beating it back and forth. It got looser and looser until it could be punched out with a long bolt.
    Mark Maras likes this.
    1976 280Z, with some minor modifications

  58. #58
    Registered User mgood's Avatar
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    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_5709.jpg 
Views:	101 
Size:	174.1 KB 
ID:	69392 Here is a picture of what I had made. I would now add a thrust bearing between the washers. also if you can get a heat treated all thread rod I would. It took some work to get them out, mine seemed to be stuck on the bushing sleeves. I would drill holes in the rubber between the sleeves and it will separate from the od and id sleeve's quicker.
    Michael 11/75 - 76-280 - HLS30-281,114
    Web site -Click Here and ORIGINAL OWNERS OF THE 280Z (1975-1976 -1977 - 1978 - ONLY) REGISTRATION[

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    POR'd and finished Just got to bolt up and torque down
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_3279.jpg 
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ID:	69393
    Life's a journey; enjoy the ride!

    Mitchell
    L28 - N42 Block w/Flat tops - N42 Rebello Head & Cam - Triple 40 PHH Mikuni's - Headers - Recaro Seats -
    R180 3.9 Diff - Close Ratio 5 Speed - Toyota Vented Brake Upgrade w/ Porterfield High Performance Pads & Shoes

    1972 Datsun 240z
    HLS30-75040


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    The real problem spindle pin removal is related to the locking wedge bolt in the middle. If someone has overtightened that wedge, or tried to drive the pin out without removing the wedge, the pin will be swagged into the housing. In that case I really doubt that any threaded pin puller is going to break it loose. It was all that a 30 ton press could do to push the cut-off center section of my pins out of the housing.

    If I ever have to do this again, I will save myself the time and trouble of trying to pull them intact. Just buy new pins, cut the old ones with a SawsAll, and press out the remantants.
    '71 240Z, Because any fool can drive fast in a straight line.

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    Mitchell

    That is looking good.

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    Replaced the pins on my 72 back in 94, installed new bushings, not too much of a problem. I'm going to tackle the 10/69 this spring.
    10/69 Fairlady ZL 5-speed
    '72 240Z
    '09 Nissan Altima Coupe

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