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Thread: using antiseeze do you lower your torque by 20%

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    Registered User jeanp's Avatar
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    Default using antiseeze do you lower your torque by 20%

    Just to see who does and who dont?


    If not do you decrease at all or not at all?

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    Supporting Member Zedyone_kenobi's Avatar
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    What you are decreasing is running torque. I always torque based on running torque plus specified torque. Dirty threads add resistance to bolt insertion.
    This resistance eats up some of the torque required to reach proper bolt stretch. Since we do not all measure bolts before and after to ensure proper stretch, getting the threads as free running as possible is important. Specified torques in books do not take into consideration galled threads, dirty threads, rusted fasteners, etc.

    So clean those threads, run thread correctors, and use antiseize liberally to get those running torqued down to as close to zero as you can.
    1971 240Z HLS30-38691
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    Now with 100% more DATSUN SPIRIT L28 Power
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    Registered User LeonV's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zedyone_kenobi View Post
    What you are decreasing is running torque. I always torque based on running torque plus specified torque. Dirty threads add resistance to bolt insertion.
    This resistance eats up some of the torque required to reach proper bolt stretch. Since we do not all measure bolts before and after to ensure proper stretch, getting the threads as free running as possible is important. Specified torques in books do not take into consideration galled threads, dirty threads, rusted fasteners, etc.

    So clean those threads, run thread correctors, and use antiseize liberally to get those running torqued down to as close to zero as you can.
    Dry torque specs don't account for anti-sieze, so using it will definitely require a smaller torque value when compared to a dry torque spec. Ideally, the conditions for the torque spec are mentioned (dry, lubricated, etc.). Most of the torque felt at the wrench is friction, with maybe 10-15% accounting for actual bolt strain. By drastically reducing friction, the bolt will either yield (losing preload) or break.

    Here's a great site on this topic, parroted from Tony D: Information related to bolted joints
    2/74 260Z

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    Registered User Gary in NJ's Avatar
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    When given I follow the "wet" torque spec. If given as a range, such as "36-42 lb/ft" I'll torque to the lower figure.
    Gary
    Guardian of HLS30-91415
    Previous Owner of a 10/70 240Z ('83-'85)

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    Registered User jeanp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by

    Here's a great site on this topic, parroted from Tony D: [url=http://www.boltscience.com/pages/info.htm
    Information related to bolted joints[/url]

    i did a quick look on the thing looks interesting i will certainly read all. Note that the question is more like who does and who dont consider the difference
    and when not specified consider dry torque???

    Thank's for the link keep on learning

    There are a lot of chart for torque by size and bolt grade with both values but look at let say Haynes manual there is only one value and i did not read where they say if it is dry or wet torque.
    so normaly i consider dry torque so i will reduce the torque a bit.

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    Registered User jeanp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by

    Here's a great site on this topic, parroted from Tony D: [url=http://www.boltscience.com/pages/info.htm
    Information related to bolted joints[/url]

    i did a quick look on the thing looks interesting i will certainly read all. Note that the question is more like who does and who dont consider the difference
    and when not specified consider dry torque???

    Thank's for the link keep on learning

    There are a lot of chart for torque by size and bolt grade with both values but look at let say Haynes manual there is only one value and i did not read where they say if it is dry or wet torque.
    so normaly i consider dry torque so i will reduce the torque a bit.

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