Results 1 to 33 of 33

Thread: Making Fusible Links

  1. #1
    1978 280Z (stock) TomoHawk's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-2169
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    NorthCoast, Ohio
    Age
    58
    Posts
    6,497

    Default Making Fusible Links

    In stead of ordering fusible links from an eBay seller, or from a mail-order retailer, both of which are getting harder to find and may soon be no longer available at all, I think I can get the correct wire from local Auto Parts stores.

    I have not had an opportunity to dissect one to see how it's made, so I'm asking if anyone has looked into this. It looks like a fusible link is just a short segment of insulated wire with a female blade-connector crimped to the ends, but the OE ones look like the connector pierces the insulation to make contact with the wire inside.

    After I get some replacements installed, I will take apart one of the old ones to see how you could make one yourself.
    Drive Responsibly.
    enjoy classic Rock music.

  2. #2
    Walmart greeter Mikes Z car's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-18366
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    1,041
    Blog Entries
    24

    Default

    I thought I looked at how the links are made and there was insulation made of fiberglass (in addition to the wire insulation?) with the idea that it won't melt at high temperature keeping any melting metal from a burning out link from falling on anything and starting a fire. Then there was the idea that the link is one gauge smaller than the wire it was protecting, but maybe a non standard smaller gauge? It might be that the insulation is pierced to insure that all of copper conductor part of the link is fully encapsulated with the fiberglass insulation. If you take one apart please post pictures I am curious about how they make the links. I wonder if a caliper could be used to verify the gauge of the link wire though that might be tricky if the link is stranded, don't know.

  3. #3
    1978 280Z (stock) TomoHawk's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-2169
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    NorthCoast, Ohio
    Age
    58
    Posts
    6,497

    Default

    Ah, the enigma off the fusible link.

    I'm going to cut up the old fusible link later on, but I agree that it's most likely not a normal type of electrical conductor. First off, it's very flexible, like a piece of lead solder, which does melt at a specific temperature. It needs to be insulated from engine heat, and tolerant to the the heat generated from flowing electronic current. It also needs to be contained once melted, and the outer jacket may even be charred, depending on the circumstances of the overload.


    I just received a set of new fusible fuse links (three brown and 1 black) and they are all of a noticeably smaller gauge, especially the brown one. BTW- I got them through eBay from "z-connexion" who has a good reputation for parts, IMO. I suppose, because of modern technological advances in metal alloys, fusible links are now made of a smaller gauge?
    Drive Responsibly.
    enjoy classic Rock music.

  4. #4
    Walmart greeter Mikes Z car's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-18366
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    1,041
    Blog Entries
    24

    Default

    They are supposed to be 4 AWG sizes smaller than the wire they protect per Wikipedia at

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fusible_link

    An electrical fusible link is a type of electrical fuse that is constructed simply with a short piece of wire typically four American wire gauge sizes smaller than the wire that is being protected. For example, an AWG 16 fusible link might be used to protect AWG 12 wiring. Electrical fusible links are common in high-current automotive applications. The wire in an electrical fusible link is encased in high-temperature fire-resistant insulation to reduce hazards when the wire melts.

    I wonder if the wire you have is flexible because it is a smaller gauge or because it is made out of some alloy?

  5. #5
    Low Budget/High Value
    Member ID
    CZCC-20342
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Washington County, OR
    Posts
    3,629

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TomoHawk View Post
    I suppose, because of modern technological advances in metal alloys, fusible links are now made of a smaller gauge?
    Probably just the insulation.
    1976 280Z, with some minor modifications

  6. #6
    Registered User beermanpete's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-21519
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Northridge, California, U.S.A.
    Age
    56
    Posts
    631

    Default

    The wire used is ordinary copper wire coated with silicone insulation. Like any fuse, it needs to have a smaller cross-sectional area to ensure it melts before the circuit it protects, hence the 4 wire gauges smaller rule of thumb. The silicone insulation is used so it does not burn and cause a fire. As a result, the fusible link can open (do its job) without damaging the insulation which is why they are sometimes overlooked when troubleshooting a no-power condition.

  7. #7
    1978 280Z (stock) TomoHawk's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-2169
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    NorthCoast, Ohio
    Age
    58
    Posts
    6,497

    Default

    I remember reading some old literature that said the fuse link would look charred if it had melted (BTW- the melting point of copper is 2000! degrees F) but modern parts are different, obviously.
    Drive Responsibly.
    enjoy classic Rock music.

  8. #8
    Walmart greeter Mikes Z car's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-18366
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    1,041
    Blog Entries
    24

    Default

    Tomo,
    One thing I read yesterday is that you can pull on the ends of a burned out fusible link and it will stretch like a rubber band.
    beermanpete,
    Thank you for the information.

  9. #9
    1978 280Z (stock) TomoHawk's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-2169
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    NorthCoast, Ohio
    Age
    58
    Posts
    6,497

    Default

    That's probably right, if if the insulation is really made of a silicone material.

    Anyway-

    I dissected the severed fusible link for the headlamps (it's a brown one) and took a few photos.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Fuse Link 01.JPG 
Views:	44 
Size:	25.7 KB 
ID:	71556

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Fuse Link 02.JPG 
Views:	63 
Size:	40.0 KB 
ID:	71557

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Fuse Link 03.JPG 
Views:	55 
Size:	42.1 KB 
ID:	71558


    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Fuse Link 04.JPG 
Views:	62 
Size:	37.6 KB 
ID:	71559

    I noticed that some of the copper strands were melted together, as if you tinned them with solder. The rest of the strands were corroded black, in the usual way.

    NOTE: You should probably install new fusible links, to provide proper protection from overloads. Old ones aren't up to the standard.

    The conductive part was certainly not very substantial, and it looks like the new fusible link I just got has the same size conductor, but with a slightly thinner outer jacket.

    I think we can finally say that a fusible link is not "just like" a fuse, as some people who install MaxiFuses think. Neither can you say that there is an equivalent amperage. As Beermanpete stated, it's simply a smaller gauge conductor, and if you wish, you could make your own fusible link, with out any "voodoo" science involved, and that it is perfectly safe to use a piece of WIRE in place of the fusible link, as long as it's the correct gauge of wire.
    Last edited by TomoHawk; 05-16-2014 at 09:14 AM.
    Drive Responsibly.
    enjoy classic Rock music.

  10. #10
    1978 280Z (stock) TomoHawk's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-2169
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    NorthCoast, Ohio
    Age
    58
    Posts
    6,497

    Default

    So now I'm off to the dollar-store to see if I can find a plastic tube suitable for holding my spare fusible links. Incense or pipe leaner containers come to mind. I think I'll do that tomorrow, since it's next to the coffee shop.
    Drive Responsibly.
    enjoy classic Rock music.

  11. #11
    Registered User madkaw's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-7622
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    bloomington IN
    Age
    57
    Posts
    2,288

    Default

    I guess I would wonder why anyone would take the effort and time to deal with fusable links unless you were stuck on Only doing Oem .
    Time and effort to do an updated fused link of some kind that doesn't leave you guessing - what's in the wire?
    Just IMHO
    Steve
    71 240z,bw-5sp 2.4-40 over,balanced,e-88,big valves,ported&polished, stage2,header, triple Mikuni's 40's
    3.90 Subaru STI LSD

  12. #12
    Walmart greeter Mikes Z car's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-18366
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    1,041
    Blog Entries
    24

    Default

    What I read is that a fusible link can briefly withstand a greater short circuit than a fuse can. If true then a maxi fuse might blow prematurely compared to the protection offered by a fusible link. But, new cars don't use fusible links, they use fuses right? My own car (240Z) has a hard to find large glass cylinder 40A fuse in place of the fusible link, no problem so far but I have had no short circuits. If my battery goes dead and the 60A alternator in the car tries to push 60A charge current through that 40A fuse I might be looking to find a replacement fuse. I would want to keep melting wire from a fusible link burning out off of anything but what material would offer that high temperature protection that you could buy? A fiberglass sleeve? Cooper makes fusible links that are a tin alloy and another kind that is a silver alloy but I didn't see any indication they use them in automotive applications, just in load centers.
    Last edited by Mikes Z car; 05-16-2014 at 11:58 AM.

  13. #13
    Low Budget/High Value
    Member ID
    CZCC-20342
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Washington County, OR
    Posts
    3,629

    Default

    If you prowl the salvage yards you'll see many fusible links on pretty high-end luxury cars, like BMW's, up in to years in the (edit - not sure of year)s. And if you're familiar with home fuses, you'll know of "slow-blow" fuses, used to take a surge so that fuses don't blow unnecessarily. If they didn't look like scabbed-on backyard fixes even when brand-new, people would probably be fine with fusible links. And it they rated them by current flow, like a typical fuse, that would help too. But, instead, they're ugly looking, confusing scraps of wire. Unfortunately, even if you want to swap to fuses, yous still have to calculate the desired upper limit for current on the circuit. Just one of those primitive things that has stuck around, like the AAR valve.
    Last edited by Zed Head; 05-16-2014 at 12:18 PM.
    1976 280Z, with some minor modifications

  14. #14
    Registered User EuroDat's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-26512
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    1,420
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Zed beat me to it.
    If you deal with electro motors, you can get up to ten times the current when they start up from rest. Its only a very short time, but its enough to blow a set of noraml fuses. In that case the fuses are "Slow blow". Google it and you will find all kinds of info on them.

    I think modern cars use them on the primary circuits. You generally find a couple of 80amp fuses, which are most probably slow blow to cope with surges.
    Like Zed Head mentioned, calculating the size fuse required is the problem.

    Chas
    Last edited by EuroDat; 05-16-2014 at 12:27 PM.
    Chas
    5/77 280Z HLS30 403100 with some modifications
    Original colour: 305 Light Blue. The PO changed it to Red

  15. #15
    Registered User madkaw's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-7622
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    bloomington IN
    Age
    57
    Posts
    2,288

    Default

    I guess I forgot my little bit of electronic knowledge from school. I wonder if the locomotives I drive have these type links for those 1200 amp surges
    Steve
    71 240z,bw-5sp 2.4-40 over,balanced,e-88,big valves,ported&polished, stage2,header, triple Mikuni's 40's
    3.90 Subaru STI LSD

  16. #16
    1978 280Z (stock) TomoHawk's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-2169
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    NorthCoast, Ohio
    Age
    58
    Posts
    6,497

    Default

    When I first started I researching fusible links, I found a lot of talk about them on websites for modern Mustangs.

    If you really wanted to replace the fusible links, IMO the best thing there is out there are manually-resettable circuit breakers. Power windows employ automatic-resetting circuit breakers.

    I wonder how many people installed the MaxiFuses,only to find that they keep blowing, until they put in an overly-large fuse?
    Last edited by TomoHawk; 05-16-2014 at 01:00 PM.
    Drive Responsibly.
    enjoy classic Rock music.

  17. #17
    Registered User
    Member ID
    CZCC-29883
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Portland, Or
    Age
    70
    Posts
    283

    Default

    I use auto-resetting circuit breakers when working on specific circuits on my cars. They replace the existing fuse & are avail. at NAPA.

  18. #18
    Registered User Bonzi Lon's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-11300
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Kingman, Kansas
    Age
    64
    Posts
    1,155

    Default

    My experience with a fusible link (73) was during refurbishment. With both battery cables being black they were placed on backward. I noticed a larger spark than normal, then saw below the fusible link starting to smoke and could see red heat going from right to left. I quickly disconnected the post that was in my hand. The fusible link was about half burned, then I noticed what had happened. I figured it burned about 3 seconds for the 6 inch length.

    The next day I found a replacement at the auto parts store for a Ford. Same amperage and diameter as the FSM called for. Worked fine. A red battery cable was installed at the same time.

    It sure smoked, but saved my wiring.

    Bonzi Lon
    1973 HLS30-168500
    1968 SPL311-18100
    1969 HLS30-000110 SOLD Shipped to Dubai UAE
    CZCC#11300

    Ones and Zeros

    "We drive only blue cars." Dishwalla

  19. #19
    Nova Scotia,Canada,Earth Blue's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-7641
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    NS
    Posts
    4,085

    Lightbulb

    After a lot of thought, I think this is the essence:


    1. Fusible links protect the wires in the harness.


    2. Fuses protect devices that are connected to the harness.
    There is scarcely anything in the world that some man cannot make a little worse, and sell a little more cheaply.
    The person who buys on price alone is this man's lawful prey.


    John Ruskin (1819 - 1900)



    ZCars in Eastern Canada seaport ready for shipment to Europe

    http://ZSportCanada.com


  20. #20
    No more body roll! SteveJ's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-5413
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Gainesville, GA
    Age
    53
    Posts
    3,651

    Default

    I'll beg to differ with you on point #2, Phil.

    Most fuses in a car are are there to protect wiring. Most circuits in our cars have several components wired in parallel. A great example of this is found with our running lights. There is a 20 A fuse for the circuit. It is designed to protect the wiring. Fusing for a component actually only exists to protect against an overvoltage condition, and it is usually downstream of a fuse for the wiring.

    Why do I say this?
    A component will have an impedance or an impedance range. Unless the component has failed, it will maintain at least the minimum impedance. Since current is voltage divided by resistance (impedance), the only way for the current to go up is for the voltage to increase. If the designer isn't suffering from cranial/anal insertion syndrome, the component is designed to handle up to about 15VDC. If you have a voltage regulator go bad, the voltage may spike. To protect the component, it has a fuse rated for the current that the component would see at a lower voltage, say 12 to 14 volts.
    73 240Z
    74 260Z

    Blue's collection of tech tips - A great place to look for answers
    XenonS30 -The cheap source for FSMs
    Georgia Z Club
    Fiddling with Z Cars - Z car tips & tricks and pictures of my car-loving life.
    Steve's CARtography - Just car pictures.

  21. #21
    Nova Scotia,Canada,Earth Blue's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-7641
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    NS
    Posts
    4,085

    Default

    I partially agree. I was only thinking of radios, horns, and electric motors (starter, fan, blower, antenna, wipers).

    After further thought I think fuses are to protect in anomalous conditions where the nominal expected load is exceeded. This would prevent fires when something shorts downstream.. only 1 spark and no time to heat up.

    If fuses were to protect wires then wouldn't the values be much higher? I guess for the defroster this is true as it is wire but for most devices I think the fuse is sized for protecting an unforeseen condition where the nominal current drawn from the device or ganged devices (such as lights) is exceeded?
    Last edited by Blue; 05-17-2014 at 12:50 PM.
    There is scarcely anything in the world that some man cannot make a little worse, and sell a little more cheaply.
    The person who buys on price alone is this man's lawful prey.


    John Ruskin (1819 - 1900)



    ZCars in Eastern Canada seaport ready for shipment to Europe

    http://ZSportCanada.com


  22. #22
    1978 280Z (stock) TomoHawk's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-2169
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    NorthCoast, Ohio
    Age
    58
    Posts
    6,497

    Default

    I think I would reverse your #2, to say fuses protect the wiring from (overloads caused by) devices. But that's just me.

    Still, I think it reinforces the idea that Maxi fuses aren't a good choice to replace fusible links. Could you replace your tires with rubber bands?
    Last edited by TomoHawk; 05-17-2014 at 03:31 PM.
    Drive Responsibly.
    enjoy classic Rock music.

  23. #23
    Registered User beermanpete's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-21519
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Northridge, California, U.S.A.
    Age
    56
    Posts
    631

    Default

    The primary purpose of a fuse is to prevent fires (this is more important in homes, but who wants a car fire?) Think about it. If a component starts drawing too much current it is already bad so there is nothing to protect. Without a fuse the high current from a failed component could cause the wiring to overheat and melt, smoke, and eventaly the insulation or other flamable material near the wire will catch fire. The purpose of a fuse is to interupt the current flow before the circuit it is in can get hot enough to start a fire.

    Fuses have a rating for I2T (Current Squared times Time), which is essentially a heat vs. time rating. This helps the engineers designing the product (cars in our case) select a fuse that will provide the required level of safety while avoiding nuisance tripping from in-rush currents (turn-on surges) and other expected, short term high current conditions. Also, the fuses used in cars will only handle about 80 percent of their current rating indefinitely. At their rated current they will open in about one hour. I have never found any ratings, running current or I2T, for fusilble links so it is difficult to make a fair direct comparison. I suspect the I2T for a fusible link is rather large (compared to regular fuses) since fusible links have a much larger surface area (providing more heat dissipation) and seem to be made of copper rather than a special low melting temperature alloy.

  24. #24
    Registered User
    Member ID
    CZCC-751
    Join Date
    Feb 2000
    Location
    Oakley, CA 94561
    Posts
    67

    Default

    Beermanpete is correct, Fusible links, fuses and circuit breakers are there to protect the wiring from burning and starting fires. They are not there to protect the equipment (the load) at the end of the wire, but to prevent fires from an overloaded / shorted condition.

    I have seen the results of not using fusing in a large multiple motor control system that had a short in one motor that caused burnt wiring and damaged controllers throughout the system. The repairs cost many thousands of dollars and hours of work to repair.

  25. #25
    Nova Scotia,Canada,Earth Blue's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-7641
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    NS
    Posts
    4,085

    Default

    Again, I partially agree. I have had experiences where a blown fuse permitted me to inspect the load and correct a problem without any sparks or burning. The fuse protected the load in these cases.
    There is scarcely anything in the world that some man cannot make a little worse, and sell a little more cheaply.
    The person who buys on price alone is this man's lawful prey.


    John Ruskin (1819 - 1900)



    ZCars in Eastern Canada seaport ready for shipment to Europe

    http://ZSportCanada.com


  26. #26
    Rust Inhibitor jeremy93ls's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-29970
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Canton, GA
    Age
    43
    Posts
    19

    Default

    Here's what I came up with before reading waaaay too much about fusible links in my 78. I just had some stuff laying around and made these saturday morning. I still need some 50A and 80A fuses but will have to order them online if I continue with these.

    BTW, I am troubleshooting some weird no-power with the key on problems and thought the stock links might be the cause.



  27. #27
    1978 280Z (stock) TomoHawk's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-2169
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    NorthCoast, Ohio
    Age
    58
    Posts
    6,497

    Default

    I saw someone do that somewhere else. If you use fuses like that, then you need to make SURE that the short wires aren't the week part of the circuit; use extra heavy wires for that, or better- metal strips.
    Drive Responsibly.
    enjoy classic Rock music.

  28. #28
    Rust Inhibitor jeremy93ls's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-29970
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Canton, GA
    Age
    43
    Posts
    19

    Default

    I used 14 gauge for these.. but now you have me second-guessing
    78 280Z, 4-speed

  29. #29
    Walmart greeter Mikes Z car's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-18366
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    1,041
    Blog Entries
    24

    Default

    Someone correct me if any of this is wrong but 14 gauge is commonly used in house lighting circuits and is usually protected with a 15A fuse. 12 gauge house wiring for wall sockets is protected with 20A fuses. But in automotive applications they would fuse those same wires with larger fuses. Maybe fire is more of a problem in a house because it kills people but if a fire starts in a car you just hop out and run off? The gauge VS fuse size issue was discussed on another thread a while back. Does anyone have a chart showing what gauge wires in a car are protected with what size fuses? I THINK 16 gauge wire in the early Z car is protected with 20A fuses. The 40A fusible link at the starter in the early Z protects a 12 gauge wire right? All this rambling would seem to indicate a 12 gauge wire would be needed for the short wires to the 40A fuse.
    Last edited by Mikes Z car; 05-19-2014 at 05:39 PM.

  30. #30
    No more body roll! SteveJ's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-5413
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Gainesville, GA
    Age
    53
    Posts
    3,651

    Default

    Jeremy, if you're having electrical issues, I think I know someone not too far away who knows something about Z car electrical systems...
    73 240Z
    74 260Z

    Blue's collection of tech tips - A great place to look for answers
    XenonS30 -The cheap source for FSMs
    Georgia Z Club
    Fiddling with Z Cars - Z car tips & tricks and pictures of my car-loving life.
    Steve's CARtography - Just car pictures.

  31. #31
    Rust Inhibitor jeremy93ls's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-29970
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Canton, GA
    Age
    43
    Posts
    19

    Default

    Thanks for the offer, SteveJ

    I went everywhere today looking for female blade clips that will fit those male prongs inside the link covers. I'll order some online and remake them using thicker gauge wire.
    78 280Z, 4-speed

  32. #32
    No more body roll! SteveJ's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-5413
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Gainesville, GA
    Age
    53
    Posts
    3,651

    Default

    The rule of thumb that I have read is that you should use fusible link wire that is two sizes smaller than the wire you are protecting. For instance, if it is 10 AWG primary, you should use 14 AWG fusible link wire. Using the wrong gauge wire would be like putting in a bigger fuse because the smaller fuse kept blowing.

    You can find the size of the fusible link wires in the FSM.
    73 240Z
    74 260Z

    Blue's collection of tech tips - A great place to look for answers
    XenonS30 -The cheap source for FSMs
    Georgia Z Club
    Fiddling with Z Cars - Z car tips & tricks and pictures of my car-loving life.
    Steve's CARtography - Just car pictures.

  33. #33
    Rust Inhibitor jeremy93ls's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-29970
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Canton, GA
    Age
    43
    Posts
    19

    Default

    In my situation, it seems to me that it wouldn't matter how thick the stranded wire was under the fusible link covers as long as the blade-fuse itself was the weakest link. Right? Instead of 50A and 80A blade fuses, I could use 40A and 70A fuses to be safe.

    I see what you're saying about using smaller fusible link wire and that makes sense. I may just order a set of Nissan fusible links and scrap the blade-fuse idea all together.
    78 280Z, 4-speed

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Fusible Links
    By Weasel73240Z in forum Electrical (S30)
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 08-18-2008, 03:56 AM
  2. Fusible links help
    By Weasel73240Z in forum Help Me !!
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 08-08-2008, 09:26 AM
  3. Fusible Links
    By superfunk in forum Electrical (S30)
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 04-03-2007, 09:48 PM
  4. Fusible Links
    By lance75_280z in forum Help Me !!
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 03-19-2003, 09:36 AM
  5. Fusible links
    By gealicpride in forum Open Discussions
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 01-20-2003, 10:23 AM

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •