Results 1 to 28 of 28

Thread: 1971 Rear Strut Replacement

  1. #1
    Registered User
    Member ID
    CZCC-30294
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Vancouver
    Age
    34
    Posts
    125

    Default 1971 Rear Strut Replacement

    Hello all,

    I attempted the rear strut replacement this afternoon on my 1971 240z. After failing, and doing a search doing it the way the manual says to do it is a joke.

    Then there is the Atlantic Z way of doing it (Disconnect the opposite side of the transverse link), which I was going to attempt to do before I saw this little video.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ctP8pcC8L0o

    Fast forward to 1:50 to see what I am talking about.

    From what I can tell, I would only have to disconnect brake lines, disconnect driveshafts at the hub, the three bolts on the top of the strut and it should all drop down, and swing out? Is this correct?

  2. #2
    Low Budget/High Value
    Member ID
    CZCC-20342
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Washington County, OR
    Posts
    3,629

    Default

    How did you "fail"? Might give a clue for some good advice.

    Search "Arne" and strut replacement and you might find a thread on the 240Z. I think that it was Arne who wrote something up. Yes, you should be able to just swing out the strut and get the job done. It's actually harder for the 280Z's because the strut is longer.

    Also, yes, the FSM procedure doesn't really work. Nissan didn't know that their spindle pins would be almost impossible to remove.
    1976 280Z, with some minor modifications

  3. #3
    Registered User
    Member ID
    CZCC-3609
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Clearwater,Florida USA
    Age
    75
    Posts
    4,424

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HuD 91gt View Post
    From what I can tell, I would only have to disconnect brake lines, disconnect driveshafts at the hub, the three bolts on the top of the strut and it should all drop down, and swing out? Is this correct?
    More or less - I loosen the nuts on the ends of the spindle pins as well - makes the strut assembly easier to drop down. I also loosen the top nut on the strut rod a bit - while it is still secured in the car. Also always use a good penetrating oil on every nut before you start..

    The Factory procedure - really didn't take into account 40+ year old spindle pins.

    FWIW,
    Carl B.

  4. #4
    Registered User
    Member ID
    CZCC-30294
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Vancouver
    Age
    34
    Posts
    125

    Default

    The Spindle Pins were my issue. Although, they do move side to side with a light tapping of a mallet, I can't seem to get the bolt (Sorry I forget the name) which is underneath, in the centre of said transverse link pin to budge. The manual doesn't explain it well (Does it get removed from the top? Tapered fit?), and I don't want to start hammering (The nut is removed).

    I'll give this way a go, it seems pretty simple. Also Carl, thanks for the advice on loosening the top nut. Without an impact wrench, I would have been stuck without you reminding me. I did that on my last strut removal 10 years ago. Apparently I didn't learn my lesson.
    Last edited by HuD 91gt; 07-31-2014 at 08:33 AM.

  5. #5
    Registered User er34gtt2000jp's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-8081
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Sacramento CA
    Age
    45
    Posts
    466

    Default

    I did my struts on my 71' and just took the entire lower control arm and strut off as an assembly and over to the bench. Pop off the spring perch and swap strut cartridge. Took maybe two hours or a bit more total to do both sides. Don't forget the new bump stop or you just might find yourself changing struts again soon if they bottom out and destroy the internal valving.

  6. #6
    No more body roll! SteveJ's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-5413
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Gainesville, GA
    Age
    53
    Posts
    3,651

    Default

    This is what I did, based upon advice from an experienced friend. It is similar to what you described.
    Remove the wheel.
    Disconnect the brake line.
    Disconnect the half shaft from the wheel.
    Disconnect the sway bar if present.
    Remove the three nuts at the insulator.
    The assembly dropped down nicely.

    When reassembling, use a small jack to lift the assembly up. Then attach in reverse of disassembly.

    I had to do this a couple of times when replacing the springs and struts. Since I had to cut the springs to the desired height (Chevette springs), I got good at it. The third time took me only 2 hours to disassemble, cut, and reassemble both sides.
    73 240Z
    74 260Z

    Blue's collection of tech tips - A great place to look for answers
    XenonS30 -The cheap source for FSMs
    Georgia Z Club
    Fiddling with Z Cars - Z car tips & tricks and pictures of my car-loving life.
    Steve's CARtography - Just car pictures.

  7. #7
    Low Budget/High Value
    Member ID
    CZCC-20342
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Washington County, OR
    Posts
    3,629

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HuD 91gt View Post
    I can't seem to get the bolt (Sorry I forget the name) which is underneath, in the centre of said transverse link pin to budge. The manual doesn't explain it well (Does it get removed from the top? Tapered fit?), and I don't want to start hammering (The nut is removed).
    It is a tapered pin,or lock bolt, that fits in a notch in the spindle pin to keep it from spinning and moving back and forth. You can try threading the nut back partially, then tapping on the nut to removed the pin. Use the nut to save the threads. You might find though that you still can't remove the spindle pin, the edges of the notch may have deformed and it will bind on its way out. It would save some brake line time if you can do it that way.
    1976 280Z, with some minor modifications

  8. #8
    Registered User
    Member ID
    CZCC-3609
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Clearwater,Florida USA
    Age
    75
    Posts
    4,424

    Default

    Speaking of Brake Lines and the old flair nuts on them. . . .It is time to recommend getting a set of IRWIN Vice Grips, which have a great head for holding Flair Nuts without rounding them off. These come in different lengths - you need the smaller sizes for brake line work.

    Irwin Vise-Grip Locking Wrench — 7in., Model# 04 | Locking Pliers| Northern Tool + Equipment

    FWIW,
    Carl B.
    Last edited by Carl Beck; 07-31-2014 at 11:54 AM.

  9. #9
    Registered User Jarvo2's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-26781
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Plainfield, IL
    Age
    42
    Posts
    238

    Default

    Is there any reason that I should be hanging onto the original strut inserts after I upgraded to tokiko's? They're 42 years old & I didn't think they could be rebuilt. Should I keep them or send them off for scrap?
    Dave
    Windy City Z Club (Chicago)
    1972 240z, restoration in progress
    http://jarvas240z.blogspot.com

  10. #10
    Jim Arnett jfa.series1's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-22303
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Richardson TX
    Posts
    764

    Default

    Here's a pic of the locking pin for the spindle. Apply a penetrating product around it, let it sit overnight. Loosen the nut a bit and give it a few light taps - not heavy enough to deform the threads. It should pop out. if you are only replacing shocks, no need to break down the spindle.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	06. Spindle lock bolt.jpg 
Views:	17 
Size:	61.0 KB 
ID:	73029  

    Jim Arnett
    HLS30-15320 12/1970, original owner
    L24-020208 (original)
    IZCC Original Owner Registry #53

  11. #11
    Registered User
    Member ID
    CZCC-30294
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Vancouver
    Age
    34
    Posts
    125

    Default

    Spent 4 hours today, and managed to get one replaced, and the other down to the gland nut on the strut insert. These things are on there. Time to head to the tool store to pickup the largest pipe wrench a man can by. I applied heat and penetrating oil over and over. Not budging. The first one took 30 minutes to loosen. I spent over an hour on the second and nothing.

  12. #12
    Registered User er34gtt2000jp's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-8081
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Sacramento CA
    Age
    45
    Posts
    466

    Default

    Carl said: Irwin Vise-Grip Locking Wrench — 7in., Model# 04 | Locking Pliers| Northern Tool + Equipment

    That's in ingenious tool my friend! Gotta get one of those ASAP!

  13. #13
    No more body roll! SteveJ's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-5413
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Gainesville, GA
    Age
    53
    Posts
    3,651

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HuD 91gt View Post
    Spent 4 hours today, and managed to get one replaced, and the other down to the gland nut on the strut insert. These things are on there. Time to head to the tool store to pickup the largest pipe wrench a man can by. I applied heat and penetrating oil over and over. Not budging. The first one took 30 minutes to loosen. I spent over an hour on the second and nothing.
    Before I did my rear struts, I kept applying brake fluid via an oil squirt can around the gland nuts. When I went to take off the gland nuts, they came off fairly easily.
    73 240Z
    74 260Z

    Blue's collection of tech tips - A great place to look for answers
    XenonS30 -The cheap source for FSMs
    Georgia Z Club
    Fiddling with Z Cars - Z car tips & tricks and pictures of my car-loving life.
    Steve's CARtography - Just car pictures.

  14. #14
    HLS30A 17574 djwarner's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-27817
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Central FLorida
    Posts
    405

    Default

    There was a recent thread about using a 50-50 solution of ATF and Acetone to loosen frozen nuts. Worth a try.

    http://www.classiczcars.com/forums/h...-research.html
    1971 240Z HLS30A 17574 L24-021025

  15. #15
    Registered User
    Member ID
    CZCC-30294
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Vancouver
    Age
    34
    Posts
    125

    Default

    They've been soaking in that concoction all night

  16. #16
    Registered User
    Member ID
    CZCC-3609
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Clearwater,Florida USA
    Age
    75
    Posts
    4,424

    Default

    IMHO - anyone working on these old cars - should have a supply of Kroil Penetrating Oil in their garage. While ATF/Acetone may indeed work a bit better - I don't like the thought of using Acetone on anything. Kano Lab's Kroil is without question the best available Penetrating Oil that you can buy. That and it actually smells pleasant, while it won't destroy any painted surfaces.

    Yes, it is a bit expensive when you have to pay shipping costs - Nonetheless if you use it, you'll not likely ever go back to anything else. It works wonders - far better than the stuff you buy at the AutoParts Stores. Kroil - Aero-Kroil is the aerosol can.
    Try it "Risk Free" - with their current Buy One of anything - Get One Free.
    Two Can's will last the average person a year to two.
    https://www.kanolabs.com/orders/order_kroil.shtml

    FWIW,
    Carl B.

  17. #17
    Registered User
    Member ID
    CZCC-3609
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Clearwater,Florida USA
    Age
    75
    Posts
    4,424

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by er34gtt2000jp View Post
    Carl said: Irwin Vise-Grip Locking Wrench — 7in., Model# 04 | Locking Pliers| Northern Tool + Equipment

    That's in ingenious tool my friend! Gotta get one of those ASAP!
    I think everyone knows how hard - if not impossible - it is to get the Air Injection Tubes out of the exhaust manifold - without cutting them off etc. I soaked the flair nuts down with Kroil - for a couple days - then applied some heat - locked the Irwin Vise-Grips on the flair nuts and smacked it with a heavy brass hammer - broke every one of them lose - with out rounding them off in the process.

    Someone else recommended them here on the forum a few years ago - so thanks to them!

    Carl B.

  18. #18
    Registered User
    Member ID
    CZCC-30294
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Vancouver
    Age
    34
    Posts
    125

    Default

    I wish I had this advise last week. I've since sounded off practically every brake line in the system. Now in for a much larger job then expected.


    But luck has it, an 18" pipe wrench finished the job today after a night soaked in my concoction of chemicals. Fronts are next.

  19. #19
    Nova Scotia,Canada,Earth Blue's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-7641
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    NS
    Posts
    4,085

    Default

    Be sure to fill the holes in the exhaust manifold where the pipes came through otherwise you will have a nice set of 6 whistles. This often happens if only the big threaded holes on the outside are plugged.

    We just solved this problem on a car by drilling and tapping the narrower hole where the pipe fit. We then ran long ss bolts through from the outside and ground the ends flush where they protruded inside. If you tap for a large enough bolt, the head will cover the big threaded hole on the outside and the manifold will look mighty purdy.
    Last edited by Blue; 08-02-2014 at 05:47 AM.
    There is scarcely anything in the world that some man cannot make a little worse, and sell a little more cheaply.
    The person who buys on price alone is this man's lawful prey.


    John Ruskin (1819 - 1900)



    ZCars in Eastern Canada seaport ready for shipment to Europe

    http://ZSportCanada.com


  20. #20
    Registered User S30Driver's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-21075
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Seattle Washington
    Posts
    163

    Default

    Just wanted to say thanks to Carl B. for the tip on the great Kano Kroil 2 for 1 offer. A terrific deal.
    It is $22 per can at my local nuts & bolts place, and I think the Kano deal is for the larger size can.
    I order it last night
    1977 280z 06/77

  21. #21
    Registered User
    Member ID
    CZCC-30294
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Vancouver
    Age
    34
    Posts
    125

    Default

    One last questions guys, as I think I screwed up.

    On purchasing my 240z, I researched and ordered boxes of parts. There were two poly spacer looking things sitting in said boxes that I had no idea what they were. Well after doing my rear strut replacement, I took a lol at my online order, and it looks like they are rear upper struts spacers.

    Where were these things supposed to go? I simply took out the old strut, replaced with the new struts. There was a ton of broken down rubber in the assembly which I assumed was from the missing bump stop (which I also replaced).

    I searched all my manuals and none of them lost this rear upper strut spacer. Any help?

  22. #22
    No more body roll! SteveJ's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-5413
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Gainesville, GA
    Age
    53
    Posts
    3,651

    Default

    Pictures of the extra parts would be helpful.
    73 240Z
    74 260Z

    Blue's collection of tech tips - A great place to look for answers
    XenonS30 -The cheap source for FSMs
    Georgia Z Club
    Fiddling with Z Cars - Z car tips & tricks and pictures of my car-loving life.
    Steve's CARtography - Just car pictures.

  23. #23
    Boat Anchor Repairman Captain Obvious's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-24608
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA
    Posts
    1,845

    Default

    From the description, I unfortunately believe they are supposed to go the same place the upper bearings go in the front. You don't need bearings in the rear, so they use fixed hard plastic spacers instead. If they're about the same diameter and thickness as a front upper bearing then that's what they are.

    Did you put yours together without any spacers at all between the upper spring perch and the top mount. If so, you're going to have to pull them back apart.

  24. #24
    Registered User
    Member ID
    CZCC-30294
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Vancouver
    Age
    34
    Posts
    125

    Default

    Looks like I completely missed the part.



    When I disassembled, the seat and the insulator come out as one piece, and looked to be in decent shape (I assumed they were one piece). The question is whether or not I should go it over again.

  25. #25
    Registered User
    Member ID
    CZCC-3609
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Clearwater,Florida USA
    Age
    75
    Posts
    4,424

    Default

    It is likely that the original spacers are still there. I've only seen a few of them that were broken or falling out on disassembly. Had to pry most of the old one's out - before replacing them.

    FWIW,
    Carl B.

  26. #26
    Low Budget/High Value
    Member ID
    CZCC-20342
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Washington County, OR
    Posts
    3,629

    Default

    I replaced a couple of those spacers last year and they were so molded in to their little space that you wouldn't think they were a separate piece unless you knew before hand. They're pretty well protected, not exposed at all. Mine were shiny. I only replaced them because I had bought the parts before a spring replacement, just in case.

    I wouldn't bother taking things apart again.

    I might actually have a picture of them somewhere... Found them. A little farther back than a year. One out, one in, and a comparison of fresh and squished.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_0313.JPG 
Views:	15 
Size:	106.3 KB 
ID:	73143   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_0316.JPG 
Views:	14 
Size:	129.2 KB 
ID:	73144   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_0312.JPG 
Views:	13 
Size:	118.7 KB 
ID:	73142  
    Last edited by Zed Head; 08-04-2014 at 11:57 PM.
    1976 280Z, with some minor modifications

  27. #27
    Boat Anchor Repairman Captain Obvious's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-24608
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA
    Posts
    1,845

    Default

    Good. If you assumed they were one piece and you didn't pry them apart then they're probably back where they came from and you should be OK. The old ones are probably a little deformed from the pressure over time, but I wouldn't go tearing the whole back end apart again just to change them.

    Now that you know what you're looking for, you can take a better look at them if you're ever in there again for some other reason.

  28. #28
    Registered User
    Member ID
    CZCC-30294
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Vancouver
    Age
    34
    Posts
    125

    Default

    Thanks for the help guys. I was out of town, and I think I lost a night of sleep because of this. haha. But those are definitely the spacers. Lowering springs are probably in the plans in the near future anyhow, so I can swap them out next time. Phew.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Strut replacement 240Z
    By Mikes Z car in forum Suspension and Steering (S30)
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 12-14-2012, 07:41 PM
  2. Rear Strut Replacement
    By ksechler in forum Suspension and Steering (S30)
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 12-03-2012, 10:07 PM
  3. Rear strut replacement on a '76 280Z
    By hall.nathan89 in forum Suspension and Steering (S30)
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-19-2012, 04:46 PM
  4. 1971 Hatch Strut
    By rtaylor in forum Interior (S30)
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-27-2007, 10:37 AM
  5. Strut replacement web pages
    By thefastestz in forum Tech Pubs and HowTo
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 05-19-2003, 10:25 PM

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •