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Thread: Side moulding

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    Registered User tanny's Avatar
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    Question Side moulding

    I need to take off the decorative side moulding strips to paint the 240. How are they attached and are there preferred removal and reattachment techniques? Same question for the emblems. Thanks, Victor.

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    Default they are attached

    by rivets. some like to leave them off as i do. i dont like the look they give the Z and prefer myself to leave them off.

    i would put them on the way they came off with rivets.

    what i did to remove mine was to first of course remove the rubber from the insets of the side molding then carefully use a drill to drill out the old rivets.

    good luck
    james

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    Deftly daft Alfadog's Avatar
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    Default

    Decorative??

    Youre talking about those fat rubber shopping-centre-parking-lot strips that run down the bodywork of the car, making it look like a granny drives it?

    No thanks! Leave them off!!!

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    Default

    No, the thin stock strips(I think they're stock or dealer applied) along the side of the car that are black and chrome and maybe 1/2 inch wide and 1/4 inch high that run the length of the car at door handle height. Thanks, Victor.

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    Default

    Yea, that's what I'm talking about too. I thought they were bump strips so that if something large and square bumped into you it wouldn't damage your paint work?

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    Senior Z Car Enthusiast billcapp's Avatar
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    Post side molding

    "I need to take off the decorative side moulding strips to paint the 240. How are they attached and are there preferred removal and reattachment techniques? Same question for the emblems."

    The side molding is attached with double sided tape. Heat it a little with a heat gun and pull it off. Just buy new strips to replace with; it is available at parts stores and is cheap.
    Some of the emblems are attached thru holes in the metal work with clips holding them on the backside. Just access them where you can and carefully squeeze the clips to remove them. (especially if you plan to reuse them...the pins are plastic and can break easily)
    Late '71 240Z - It ain't done til it's done!

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    Registered User tanny's Avatar
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    Default

    Thanks everyone. Victor.

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    Default

    Careful!

    Not all the side moldings were attached with double stick tape. Some were riveted to the fenders and doors THROUGH the base metal piece, and the rivet is hidden by the vinyl insert.

    On yet some other styles, they had a small clip that would be riveted to the body and then the metal strip would be clipped onto the top of the clip, followed by the vinyl insert.

    Look at the end of your moulding. Don't just look at the end piece (the one that tapers into a point) as that one is most commonly double stick taped on. Look just past where the point and the molding connect. You should be able to readily spot whether it is tape or a rivet.

    If tape, you can use Billcapp's method to ensure that you don't ruin the paint.. Or if you're already going for a repaint, and aren't worried about scratching the paint underneath, then just run a razor blade through the foam. Be careful. as sometimes these have been known to be attached by both double stick tape AND rivets.

    If rivets just drill thorugh the head with a 1/8" drill bit. This method allows you reuse the original holes for replacing it. If on the other hand you're looking to fill the holes in, use a 9/64". This will bore the hole out just a tad bigger so that your solder has clean metal to grip on to.

    To fill the holes, I use acid core solder just like if it were for plumbing. Using a 150 watt soldering iron, with the tip tapered down to a conical point, I heat the hole and sweat the solder in. By doing it immediately after removing the vinyl moulding, the metal is clean, and you don't have to worry about any rust having set in. You can then body work the area in a normal fashion.

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    Default

    My side bumpers had caps at the end that popped right off. I was then able to slide the vinyl or rubber part out to the side (from the end of the rail), and low and behold found that mine were screwed in to the metal. So they were easy to remove from there.

    Using solder to fill the holes is a great idea. I was going to try welding mine shut but I'd probably end up warping the body panels pretty bad.

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    Supporting Member EScanlon's Avatar
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    Mike:

    If they were attached with Sheet Metal Screws, and they probably were, do yourself a favor and do the following:

    Using a flat dolly, support the back or inside section of the metal. You're looking to support, not push. Then get your 1" or 1-1/2" Flat Face hammer and tap squarely on the hole while allowing the dolly to absorb the "hit" but don't rebound onto the metal. We used to call this "smack away".

    What you are doing is flattening the metal between the dolly and the hammer while absorbing the inertia / momentum of the hit in to the dolly.

    This will allow you to smooth out the "thread" of the sheet metal screw.

    FWIW
    Enrique

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    Default

    One more question on the soldering: Do you have to clear some paint from around the hole to give the solder purchase, or is the thickness of the metal around the hole enough surface for the solder to adhere to? Never have done any bodywork at all except a few small clumps of bondo and spray paint.

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    Default

    Thanks again Enrique! I checked it last night and I probably will need to straighten out the screw holes. It'll be hard to get to somem of them but if I just need something back there to hit against I should be able to do it. That reminds me - I need to buy my body work tools now. I'm getting the rotisserie that kmack built me this weekend, so I'll need them soon to work on those dented up floors. I can't wait to get this thing up and spin it around. Weee! Here's a pic of the stands.

    Michael
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    Datsaholic Mr Camouflage's Avatar
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    Those datsun dealers were Butchers. Riveting on side stripes? Drilling holes in pristine just off the boat new datsuns. And those VW style overider tubular bars are just damn ugly. Glad Aussie Dealers had more sense.
    www.nostalgictrio.com Skyline - Silvia - Fairlady Z
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    Supporting Member EScanlon's Avatar
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    Default Soldering

    The thickness of the metal is usually sufficient for what you leave behind AFTER you grind off the excess.

    For those who are wondering what this refers to, here is a fast description of when this procedure saves time and effort.

    Many times when you have a dent with a crease, or body moulding that's been riveted in place, you may end up with holes in the sheet metal. You could try to weld them shut, or braze them, but both of those procedures generate HIGH heat. Enough that if you're not quick and careful, AHEM! excuse me, EXTREMELY careful, you're going to warp the sheet metal.

    You've now compounded the problem. You've gone from a simple 1/8" diameter hole, to a 3" diameter dome OR dent. Now you have to use your shrinking body hammer to tap down, hoping to shrink the metal smoothly so that the dent can now be filled with body filler.

    Multiply that by 11 or more, PER SIDE of the vehicle (Note: this is presuming 4 rivets on each of the front and rear fenders and 3 on the door, I've seen as many as 1 rivet per 10" of moulding.), and you can see that you have a MAJOR PITA body working night mare.

    Here's a simplified fix procedure.

    Put a scalloped edge on your air grinder sanding pad by clipping the round edge with a pair of shears leaving a multipointed star shape. Then using just the edge to remove just a tad of paint around the hole to the bare metal. You don't need a lot of removal, just enough so that about 1/16" of the surrounding area is bare.

    Your soldering iron should preferably be one of those extreme heavy duty ones about 125 to 150 watts. I have one that's probably 30+ years old, but I've been told that it's similar to the ones used by folks who do stained glass windows. What you want is one that has a fat tip with a taper down to a point. Similar to a sharpened pencil that's been sharpened at an angle.

    Then apply some tinning solution to the holes. This is a caustic acid that will etch the metal so that the solder will flow and adhere. Don't use a lot as you don't want to have to chase it down to neutralize it as it WILL cause rust if allowed to just seep into the car. A drop is sufficient, or get a cheap metal epoxy mixing brush and just wet the hole.

    Heat your soldering iron. Once hot, insert the tip of the iron into the hole, wait a couple SECONDS and using Acid Core Solder (Rosin will NOT work here as the rosin will make it impossible to paint over without problems), touch the solder to the iron, let it melt and flow down until it surrounds the hole. Then smoothly but quicklly remove the iron while keeping it in contact with the edge so that the solder "films" over the hole. With practice this should only take a few seconds per hole. Don't worry about the excess solder, you'll grind that smooth later. Be careful NOT to overheat, as that will cause the solder to bead and not adhere.

    If you have problems getting the solder to film over, you probably have some impurities in the area or are either heating up too much or removing the iron too fast.

    Go around the car and fill in all your holes. Again with practice, this should take probably 5-10 minutes. When you're done, use the scalloped edge of your grinder to smooth off the bulk of the solder to conform with the body line.

    That's it. Done properly, you will have sealed the hole, not splashed a ton of Acid or Tinning solution and will have metal to back up your primer and paint.

    In case you DID get excess tinning solution or acid splashing on the surface, give it a quick wipe with either lacquer thinner (works best and fastest) or just water, but in either case make sure you neutralize that stuff or it will come back to haunt you.

    I'll explain the reason for drilling holes to remove a creased dent in another post if anyone is interested.

    Hope this helps.

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    Default

    Originally posted by Mr Camouflage
    Those datsun dealers were Butchers. Riveting on side stripes? Drilling holes in pristine just off the boat new datsuns.
    So the moldings were a dealer add on?
    The 1973 240Z 165540 Slightly modified. L28, 5sp, cam, headers, MSD 6AL, power windows, power door locks, leather seats, custom this and custom that.

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    Default i agree thanks

    love that idea of the soldering for the holes.

    i ll have to do that on my next Z

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    Datsaholic Mr Camouflage's Avatar
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    I expect so. Just like the mag wheels, rear louvers, and anything else the dealer wanted to put on the car to jack up the price.
    www.nostalgictrio.com Skyline - Silvia - Fairlady Z
    www.ozdat.com The Australian Datsun site.
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