Results 1 to 21 of 21

Thread: Pulling engine

  1. #1
    Registered User
    Member ID
    CZCC-4934
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Gilbert, AZ
    Posts
    22

    Default Pulling engine

    Hi Guys,
    Pulling the engine out of my 73 Z and had a couple of questions. I guess first, would you recommend I remove the intake mainfold, carburetors, valve cover, and heads before I lift the engine out? I've seen pictures where people take off pretty much everything they can from the engine before pulling it but then the Haynes manual shows them pulling it with all of these things attached. Does it really matter?

    Second question. I want to pull the engine while leaving the tranny in place under the car. I was going to support the tranny and unbolt it from the engine prior to pulling it. The tranny is in good shape so I'd prefer not to have to pull it out. Does leaving it pose any difficulties and would you recommend that I pull the tranny too or am I ok leaving it in?

    Kind of a restoration newbie so I appreciate your advice. Thanks in advance!

  2. #2
    Battle House!
    Member ID
    CZCC-8711
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Redmond;Washington.
    Age
    32
    Posts
    612

    Default

    I haven't pulled a motor before, but the only thing you should have to remove is all of the hoses, motor mounts (obviously) and exhaust. I was going to pull the motor out of my '73 before I got rid of it and didn't plan on pulling anything off of the top of the motor.

  3. #3
    Hakosuka sakijo's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-7932
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Sunny Hawaii
    Posts
    528

    Default

    From experience, I feel it's best to drop the tranny. The problem is not getting the engine out, but getting it back in. It's really hard to align the engine into the trans while it's bolted into the car. It may be more work, but it's easier in the long run. I take off the intake and exhaust and pull the motor.
    Miles

    1971 Skyline "Hakosuka"
    2002 Lexus GS 300

  4. #4
    Registered User 240ZGL's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-11460
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Long Beach, Ca
    Posts
    289

    Default

    I pulled my 73 mill 6 months ago, I pulled both manifolds which made the job easier. Pulled the radiator too. As for the trans, I left mine in for now, I have a tie down strap hooked from the bottom of the hood lock support to the bottom of the trans. Works for me. The motor came out real easy leaving the trans behind. Oh, have a friend help you put the hood back on. Otherwise you will wind up with the 2 paint chips on the nose emblem
    Last edited by 240ZGL; 05-07-2006 at 08:24 PM.

  5. #5
    Registered User Walter Moore's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-3035
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Indianapolis
    Posts
    1,833

    Default

    I just put my engine and transmission back in yesterday.

    I took them out as a unit and put them back in that way. I will confess that it was a pain to re-attach the transmission with the engine on a hoist and the transmission on my workbench, but with two people we got the job done.

    I really doubt that it would have been any easier to do that in the car.

    I had the intake and exaust header on when I put the engine back. I took it out with everything attached, but I haven't bought rebuilt carbs yet, so I put it back without them. When I took it out everything that was attached to the engine was pretty much worn out, so what I couldn't cut off with loping shears I used a sawsall on...

    It all looks so much better now. When I find my digital camera I will post pictures.

    The downside of taking out the transmission with the engine is that once you remove the drive shaft the nasty 90 weight gear oil inside will drip out everywhere as you manuver the thing out and then back in. The Hanes manual says to drain the trany first, but who reads directions?
    '71 240Z, Because any fool can drive fast in a straight line.

  6. #6
    Acts first, Thinks later speedyblue's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-4743
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Gold Coast Australia
    Posts
    428

    Default

    MAke sure you get all the wires and lines disconnected. The clutch hydraulic line will only take so much tensile force
    There is always something you forget.
    I drive a Z because there simply weren't enough station wagons to go around.

  7. #7
    Registered User grnskyline's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-3236
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    29

    Default Engine remove

    hey lttleren,
    I have pulled the engine a couple of times, much easier as a whole unit (eng and trans). You'd also want to remove the radiator, and hood, to prevent any damage.

    It is also much easier to work on the motor when it is out of the car, on a stand. No need to remove valve cover for removal either. I tended to remove the basics,lines, wires, hoses) leaving the manifolds on and just disconnect the exhaust altogether to prevent any snagging.
    Also dont forget your grounding straps~!

    There are some pics in my gallery of my last one.
    Have fun with it.
    cam
    Because a real mechanics hands are never clean.

    '77 260z l28, extractors, lighten flywheel, 240 carbs and still rusting.

  8. #8
    Acts first, Thinks later speedyblue's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-4743
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Gold Coast Australia
    Posts
    428

    Default

    I found it was hard tilting the engine/gearbox combo to get it in and out, but at at least you know it will go back in. Trying to allign the engine up to the gearbox is a real big pain, especially if you have taken the clutch off.
    I drive a Z because there simply weren't enough station wagons to go around.

  9. #9
    Sportscars FTW! xray's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-7009
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Raleigh NC
    Age
    49
    Posts
    984

    Default S30 engine removal

    Engine removal....

    FIRST RULE OF DISASSEMBLY: Take Pictures. Lotsa lotsa pictures. Your memory is not that great....

    Get an engine hoist. Make SURE you get a load leveler!!!!

    Drain all fluids. You're going to change them out anyway, it adds extra weight, and who needs gear oil everywhere?!?

    Remove the radiator (after it's been drained.) Take off the hood.

    Remove all items from the inner fenders...Battery, voltage reg, engine light, coil...you can most leave firewall components attached, but remove anything that could get snagged. Remove the fuel line before it enters the fuel rail, before or after fuel filter is up to you... Don't forget the heater hoses--they contain coolant, so place some towels under the engine bay. Disconnect the vacuum hose to the brake servo...

    Disconnect throttle linkage. I pulled off the ball/socket near the firewall using a small flat-head screwdriver. Disconnect the choke cables and secure them to the firewall.

    Make notes on how the wiring is attached, then disconnect engine harness from the motor itself (Alt, starter, oil press sender, Distributor, thermostat etc..) Don't forget to remove the neutral/reverse switch wires along the passenger side of the trans!

    Despite your misgivings, it's easier to remove/install with the trans attached. It's a bear to muscle the inupt shaft into the rear of the motor while on your back! The load leveler makes it even easier. Loosen the trans mount bolts. Reach around the passenger side near the mount and unscrew the speedo cable. Secure it away from the center of the car. Disconnect the flex clutch hose from the hard line. Drain the hydraulic fluid....

    Remove the exhaust--you can leave the ex manifold in place. Those three nuts holding the manifold to the primary exhaust have likely rusted, so lotsa lotsa Kroil/PB Blaster, maybe some heat. Loosen slowly to avoid shearing the stud. If it snaps, it probably needed replacing anyway.

    Remove driveshaft by removing bolts to the diff. Shaft then pulls off the output shaft of the trans.

    Loosen the motormount bolts. Your choice whether to loosen the one bolt which holds the mount to the front crossmember or the two which hold the mount to the engine mount flange.

    Attach the load leveler mounting brackets to flanges on the front right (just behind the fuel pump) and rear left (just below and behind the air tube) of the cylinder head....Bring some tension on the hoist.

    Remove the trans mount bolts, but keep something under it so it doesn't smack the concrete when it swings free.

    Remove the motor mount bolts.

    Next is a very slow and careful process. Couple inches at a time. I hoisted up until the bell housing grazed the trans tunnel, then moved forward. The up and out some more. Once the bellhousing was mostly cleared I adjusted the load leveler until it was at a nearly maximum angle. Some more up and out maneuvers.... By this point the hoist was about at maximum height, and I carefully worked the trans over the radiator support and driver's inner fender and voila--done!

    I think that's about it...anyone else can feel free to chime in with stuff I forgot...Here some pics:

    Good luck,
    Steve
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	159_5963.JPG 
Views:	164 
Size:	366.7 KB 
ID:	12271   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	159_5992.JPG 
Views:	187 
Size:	225.8 KB 
ID:	12272   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	159_5994_r1.jpg 
Views:	159 
Size:	330.9 KB 
ID:	12273   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	159_6000.JPG 
Views:	184 
Size:	279.5 KB 
ID:	12274  
    Last edited by xray; 05-08-2006 at 08:59 PM.
    Steve

    HLS30-81167 restored, top to bottom.
    2001 M roadster Gehen sie Schneller!
    1987 SpecE30 Trackster...welcome home!
    Making up for owning a minivan...
    http://picasaweb.google.com/srcartermd

  10. #10
    beandip beandip's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-1887
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Beaverton, Oregon
    Age
    81
    Posts
    4,038

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by littleren
    Hi Guys,
    Pulling the engine out of my 73 Z and had a couple of questions. I guess first, would you recommend I remove the intake manifold, carburetors, valve cover, and heads before I lift the engine out? I've seen pictures where people take off pretty much everything they can from the engine before pulling it but then the Haynes manual shows them pulling it with all of these things attached. Does it really matter?

    Kind of a restoration newbie so I appreciate your advice. Thanks in advance!
    I pulled the engine and trans as a unit . I did remove the carbs but that was all. I did the removal and installation by my self with no help. I used a Cherry picker type of hoist . I lowered the engine down to just off the floor and removed the trans and flywheel then raised it and attached the block to the engine stand. Just take your time and watch what you are doing so you don't strike the inside of the engine bay coming out. Give your self plenty of room to maneuver . Of course the radiator and hood must be removed , remember the car will rise as the engines weight is removed . So be sure you are not hampered by a low overhead . Going back in I padded the inner fenders with a couple of blankets when I reinstalled the engine because I had just painted the whole car . Going back in I left the manifolds off , because I used headers and the fit is close . I find it much more difficult to reattach the trans to the engine when it is in the car. Especially if you have a automatic. I rented the cherry picker , I recommend a engine leveler , rent one of those also. I just use a chain but I have done this many times . It can get a little spooky having to tilt the engine and the chain must slip to do this . Use a leveler ! Gary
    I'd rather die while I am living than live while I am dieing. CZC 1887 IZCC 12602 Member of NorthWest Z Car Club

  11. #11
    long time owner a7dz's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-1188
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Tacoma,WA
    Age
    66
    Posts
    742

    Default

    I pulled mine out in one piece. I only took off the hoses and linkage and wiring. Everything else came out in one piece. I did use the leveler and was able to pull the engine out by myself. I will change the clutch parts and reassemble the engine trans and put it all back the same way.
    Jim
    Bought my 70Z at 21 with 24,000 miles
    Still own it. Thirty plus years later.


  12. #12
    Registered User VaGuS510's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-8422
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    SF Bay
    Posts
    136

    Default

    As was mentioned many times, do the engine and tranny together. I did on my Z, but I needed to. It really isn't any harder to get it in and out of a Z. I have a Datsun 510, that thing has a tinny engine bay, but believe it or not I also pull both the tranny and engine on that. I had the tranny rebuilt and put it in from the bottom. After about 45 minutes of holding the transimission 12" off the ground I managed to align the input shaft. If I had to replace a tranny again I would honestly pull the whole engine, It would probably be easier and take just as long.
    73 240Z
    78 CB750F

  13. #13
    Registered User
    Member ID
    CZCC-4934
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Gilbert, AZ
    Posts
    22

    Default re: pulling engine

    Thanks for all of the feedback guys. Sounds like I'll pull both the engine and tranny at the same time. Sounds like whether I remove manifolds etc before or after pulling isn't as important as insuring I pull tranny and engine simultaneously. I was checking my car yesterday and I'm missing the back engine lift bracket (god only knows how that happened). Anyone have one I can buy? I can't find any universal ones where the bolt is metric.

  14. #14
    Registered User
    Member ID
    CZCC-9978
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Colorado Springs, CO
    Age
    57
    Posts
    114

    Default

    Resurrecting an old thread....

    Anyone know what the L24 weighs w/ and w/o the tranny? I am in the market for an engine stand and wanted to know what I need.

    Tx,
    Bill

  15. #15
    Sportscars FTW! xray's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-7009
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Raleigh NC
    Age
    49
    Posts
    984

    Default

    GUesstimate:

    Transmission: 60 lbs or so
    Head: 40 lbs or so
    Block and internals: 250-300? Too heavy for me to lift, for sure!

    Eastwood's economy engine stand holds it with no problem. If you get the kind that attaches to the bellhousing bosses, make sure it's NOT the tripod one. Four wheels on the ground are much better....
    Steve

    HLS30-81167 restored, top to bottom.
    2001 M roadster Gehen sie Schneller!
    1987 SpecE30 Trackster...welcome home!
    Making up for owning a minivan...
    http://picasaweb.google.com/srcartermd

  16. #16
    Registered User Walter Moore's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-3035
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Indianapolis
    Posts
    1,833

    Default

    Do a search on the site, but if I remember it is similar to a small block V8 in total weight. According to this thread:
    http://www.classiczcars.com/forums/s...=Engine+weight
    It is 350 with the head in place.

    Whatever it is, it is a heavy piece of iron for such a small displacement.
    Be sure to use metric grade 10.8 or 12.8 grade bolts to hold it, and the ones that attach it to the transmission are too short by the way...

    (The car parts stores will call those "grade 8" bolts, because that is the SAE equivalent)
    '71 240Z, Because any fool can drive fast in a straight line.

  17. #17
    Registered User Steve Parmley's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-1154
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    folsom ca
    Posts
    223

    Default

    A couple of things to add to xrays excellent write up is of course you need to remove the shifter and its cover. Also be careful the shifter clevis doesn't hook on the firewall brakelines as you finish lifting the engine/tranny combo out. I have bent mine before. I use matching labels to mark any wires that I disconnect and label them too.

    An old wide tire (without the wheel) makes a great temporary engine stand on the floor. Lower the oilpan into the center of the tire and then you can seperate the tranny from the engine so you can put it on an engine stand.
    Last edited by Steve Parmley; 03-08-2007 at 06:13 PM.

  18. #18
    Sportscars FTW! xray's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-7009
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Raleigh NC
    Age
    49
    Posts
    984

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Parmley View Post
    A couple of things to add to xrays excellent write up is of course you need to remove the shifter and its cover. Also be careful the shifter clevis doesn't hook on the firewall brakelines as you finish lifting the engine/tranny combo out. I have bent mine before. I use matching labels to mark any wires that I disconnect and label them too.

    An old wide tire (without the wheel) makes a great temporary engine stand on the floor. Lower the oilpan into the center of the tire and then you can seperate the tranny from the engine so you can put it on an engine stand.

    Thanks for that important addition, Steve....

    I also realized while browsing in harbor Freight that the $15 furniture dollies will hold a Z engine PERFECTLY with the oil pan nestled right in the hole. It also holds two transmissions, as well. Makes for easy shuffling when space is at a premium! Of course, they aren't great for working on them--just storage
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	181_8154_r1.jpg 
Views:	138 
Size:	246.5 KB 
ID:	17081   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	181_8155.JPG 
Views:	134 
Size:	262.0 KB 
ID:	17082   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	181_8156.JPG 
Views:	118 
Size:	280.8 KB 
ID:	17083  
    Steve

    HLS30-81167 restored, top to bottom.
    2001 M roadster Gehen sie Schneller!
    1987 SpecE30 Trackster...welcome home!
    Making up for owning a minivan...
    http://picasaweb.google.com/srcartermd

  19. #19
    Registered User
    Member ID
    CZCC-10869
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Irvine, California
    Age
    49
    Posts
    755

    Default

    xray, that is ingenious! I've gotta share that with others.
    -Bo

    1972 240z - Not original and still not done.
    "Something wicked this way comes...."

  20. #20
    Still plays with cars kenz240z's Avatar
    Member ID
    CZCC-6323
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Berthoud, CO
    Age
    53
    Posts
    738

    Default

    xray, good tip about the Harbor Freight furniture dollies! When the engine is on the dolly is there any chance it could tip over? Perhaps strapping it to the dolly might help. Having a Z engine tip over and hit your Z or your body would be a real bummer...
    Kenny P.

    '73 240Z
    '82 ZX L28
    '82 ZX 5-speed
    Round top SU's
    Tokico HP struts
    Tokico Springs
    Urethane bushings

    my gallery

  21. #21
    Registered User
    Member ID
    CZCC-8066
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia, Australia
    Age
    66
    Posts
    102

    Default

    Four old head studs work well for bolting the motor on to the engine stand. They are long enough strong enough and the thread matches.

    I used an old wheel barrow to move the engine around although those furniture dolies look good.

    I left the gearbox in and tied it ot the bonnet catch as suggested earlier. If you use an old gear shaft to make sure that the clutch is lined up ok the engine will just slip back in - very little swearing involved. It is much quicker not having to drop the tailshaft, drain the gearbox and remove console shifter etc.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •