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Thread: Hands Dirty?

  1. #1
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    Default Hands Dirty?

    One thing I've noticed about this site is that most (if not all) members here actually like getting their hands dirty, i.e. do their own mechanicals and body work, to the limit of their individual capabilities.

    However, if your significant other (otherwise known as She Who Must Be Obeyed) is anything like mine, showing up at the (fill in the blank....Govenor's Party, Afternoon Tea, Soiree, Hallowe'en party, etc) with dirty hands or fingernails....is definitely verboten.

    One way I've found that allows me to work on my Zs to my heart's desire and still look presentable afterward, is to rub a handfull of liquid dish soap into my hands BEFORE I start working.

    Just rub it in well, (NO WATER) particularly around the fingernails and cuticles. Surprisingly it isn't the least bit slippery. If anything I find it gives you a little better grip. When you're finished working, just add a little more and wash normally and ALL the dirt/grease/blood etc. washes right off.

    There are commercial hand protectors (LIquid Glove etc) but the ones I've tried don't work as well as dish soap and are expensive.

    I can't speak for other dish soaps, but the one I use, the green Polmolive, works great.

    Cheers

    Peter
    1972 240Z Resto almost finished
    1983 280ZX This winter's project

  2. #2
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    I've been using the Mechanix gloves lately and I love them. Not only can you still pick up nuts and even small screws and nails with them, they also help shield the knuckles from the inevitable scrapes and knocks.

    They are well ventilated, so your hands don't sweat, but they aren't much good in cold weather....

    They are more expensive than the Liquid Gloves or the dishwasher liquid (both of which I have used) but after using them, I wouldn't do without them....

    You can work around hot items without burns (to a reasonable degree) all the while protecting your hands from scrapes and busted knuckles.

  3. #3
    Admin Mike's Avatar
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    Keith, do you have a website where we can look at those gloves?
    Mike

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    Instant Human, ADD Coffee Z Kid's Avatar
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    Do you want to know why the detergent makes your hands grippier? Its due to the dissolving of the skins protective layer due to the basic nature of the chemicals involved in order to get the saponification reaction to work better. Its probably not good for it. I have found the best grease remover to be just powdered clothes washing stuff, does the same thing, but in contact for shorter time, and its got an abrasive component as well. Stay away from industrial stuff, it heats up on contact with water (bad). And with wearing gloves, there are some things that shouldnt be done. From my experience these include:
    Using the rattle gun
    Using the air sander
    Using any tool that spins round, and makes the rubber grip, you spend your life unwinding yourself.
    ANd if you buy cheap (doctors latex) gloves (or steal i mean borrow them from your workplace) they dissolve in fuel and make a gooey mess with similar properties to napalm, but it you're lighting stuff around fuel, you deserve to burn in hell anyhow.

  5. #5
    Registered User Stryder's Avatar
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    In our schools auto shop we use a soap called something like...(crap can't remember the name) I'll check and post it latter. btw the stuff works wonders!

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    Mike, here is their online store.

    http://www.mechanixwear.com/store/fire.asp

    I use the original style gloves.
    You can also find these at Lowe's, Ace Hardware's, most auto parts store chains, Sears etc....
    The prices are all within a buck or two from what I've seen compared to their store prices.

    And FWIW, I like using these with air tools such as sanders and stuff, they cushion your palms and you don't get that tingling feeling after you use a sander for an extended period. They do soften the vibrations quite a bit.

  7. #7
    Professional Nut carguyinok's Avatar
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    Lightbulb Mechanix gloves

    I am in love with my Mechanix gloves as well. But beware!!!! They may look like leather and they are NOT. I am just putting this up as a warning so no one else dose what I did. I had them on working on a buddys car one day. The motor was hot and I bumped the header. When the glove melted into my skin it was a real wake up call.
    Now as I said I love my Mechanix gloves and have a few pair now. One trick I found is... Buy them so they fit. Then when you get home put them in the washer then the dryer. When you get them out of the dryer the will fit tight. This helps with the feeling through the gloves. They will soon feel like a 2nd skin rather then gloves. I buy mine at sears. Mechanix makes them for sears craftsman and they sell for 19.95 and worth every dime IMO.
    I reside in Oklahoma and live at the wheel of my 240Z

    gimmie the Z or he's toast






  8. #8
    Must be the torque curve kmack's Avatar
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    I have a pair, too. But they are a take off of the Mechanix gloves. Actually, they are made by the same company but they don't say Mechanix on them. Cost $12 at PepBoys and they are bright red to match my car!

    I know, I know.....having matching gloves with your car is kind of girlish, but hey, why not?

    I have also put mine through the wringer. They have been soaked in transmission and engine oil, grease, dust, etc. you name it they've been in it. When your done, throw them in the washer, then the dryer, and they come out good as new. I wouldn't trade them for anything.

    Only complaint I had was that initially, it was hard to get used to not having that "at your finger tips" touch. But you do get a feel for them after awhile. And for working around a hot engine, you can't beat 'em!
    "When life gives you lemons, make lemonade.
    Then find someone who's life gave them Vodka and have a party!"

    KMack
    '71 240Z (Series I) - SOLD
    San Antonio, Tx
    www.geocities.com/kenshobnob
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    I work at a Nissan shop in Az (BRW's Nissan Autowerks 623-581-8440 north phx) and working in the tight areas of new cars bare hands are the best. I tried gloves, but they kept getting snagged on things. The soap we have here is great, it will even remove JB Weld with a bit o scrubbing. It is called TKO Hand cleaner by Zep.
    faster......Faster.......FASTER!!!!!!

  10. #10
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    The soap does work.The gloves are good to a point.Sometimes you do need the feel.I have a trick I wish to share for those that cook.This also will remove gas smell from your hands.Run your hands under cool water.Next rub them on your stainless steel sink.Onion,fish,tobacco etc. smell is gone.Some cook shops sell metal squares for about $10.00 .They are Stainless steel.Don't buy a hunk of sink when you already have it!!

  11. #11
    Registered User XYZ's Avatar
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    Not that I'm a real mechanic or anything but for $3.00 for a box of 100 gloves, I use the latex gloves that make your hands all sweaty and powdery. They're not too bad until they rip but since they're so cheap I just slap on another. I've seen the mechanics gloves in stores. What happens if you accidentally get oil or something on them? Does it leak through to your skin? I have a mechanic friend across the street that wears the latex gloves or something a little heavier and really likes the protection from the various toxins that he encounters. The first time I worked with him, I asked him not to laugh at me for wearing gloves and then he told me he did too. The world was right!

  12. #12
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    I too have never really been comfortable with gloves. With heavier gloves (even the Mechanix) sometimes you don't have the 'touch' that you need or as ScaryFast mentioned they snag, and thinner gloves (latex etc) are constantly ripping and/or make your hands too sweaty. Sure you can alwas take them off when you need a fine touch, but then your hands get dirty and that sort of defeats the purpose, doesn't it. And for those that don't have 'normal' hands, finding ones that fit properly can be a challenge.

    On the other hand, rubbing Palmolive (hope I don't sound like a shill ) dish soap into your hands BEFORE starting work allows you to get into really tight areas and gives you maximum touch. I've found that it also helps protect your hands from chemicals and small abrasions (maybe thats why "Madge" soaks her hands in it).

    And when you're finished working ALL the dirt etc, washes right off, no scrubbing, not pummice, etc. Daniel, I love your tip about the stainless sinks, I definitely will have to try that, nothing worse than making Thai Noodles for company then sitting down with garlic hands .

    To those that prefer gloves, and they sure do come in handy when workiing with HOT car parts, more power to you. As the French say "chacun a son gout" which translates as "to each their own swollen toe .

    Cheers

    Peter
    1972 240Z Resto almost finished
    1983 280ZX This winter's project

  13. #13
    beandip beandip's Avatar
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    Default gloves are great Mike

    I bought mine at costco two pair for 24.00 the best investment yet. I bought a set for a present to my son-in-law . I am going to get another pack at costco. I keep one pair in my truck to handel the hitch and greasy things and the other in the tool box. To clean I just use the orange hand cleaner and wash my hands with the gloves on , and they come out clean. Like 2many said they sure save the cuts and grease in the cuts ect.

  14. #14
    Registered User Datzun76's Avatar
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    I have those nasty fingernails right now and a few cuts from trying to swap out this ball joint. Battle Scars
    Better to Burn Out -Than Fadeaway.
    Flash Aces Design

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