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Thread: Transverse link help

  1. #1
    Slowly getting there... drunkenmaster's Avatar
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    Default Transverse link help

    How do i get this bolt out??

    There is a lock bolt in the centre I think i need to remove, then hopefully the pivot bolt will slide out.

    I took the nut off the lock bolt (which did nothing, dont knwo why its even there) but I cant see how to remove the the bolt itself.

    Thanks guys
    James

    http://www.classiczcars.com/forums/showthread.php?t=11123

  2. #2
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    Default

    Spray it with a little WD-40 or PB Blaster first, then put the nut back on it and give it a couple whacks with a hammer if you don't have a brass drift or a punch that will fit the end of it without ruining the threads. It should pop loose as it is just a tapered pin put in from the top.

    If you want a little more advice, you will find this to be a much easier job if you were to remove the whole strut and control arm assembly and work on it on a workbench, rather than trying to do it while it is still on the car.

    Before you try to remove the spindle pin, you ought to soak it with penetrating fluid for a day on both ends and through the locking pin hole.

    If you have trouble, use the search function here as there are many, many threads on this job and quite a few options for removing the spindle pin.
    "If it weren't for fools, the rest of us could not succeed." Mark Twain.

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    I'd air hammer that SOB. Otherwise, do as stated.

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    Default

    A machine shop can press the spindle pins out, if you have difficulty. They are usually VERY hard to remove, and end up ruined by the time they are removed. The good thing is that they are not too expensive to replace. When you reassemble (whether or not with new pins) grease the hell out of them.

  5. #5
    Slowly getting there... drunkenmaster's Avatar
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    Default

    Thanks guys.

    I have removed the whole strut already, I need to remove the link and swap it to another shortened coilover equipped strut that I have.
    Will give it a go.
    James

    http://www.classiczcars.com/forums/showthread.php?t=11123

  6. #6
    Z-ologist cnixzgo's Avatar
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    Default

    This is a very hard piece to get out and not ruin it. Both mine were ruined and I had to buy two new spindle pins. 22 bucks apiece not including the nuts, bushings and new washers.
    1978 280z A/T, No. HLS30-457084, purchased 11/2002
    1972 240z A/T, No. HLS30-60614, purchased 11/2007

  7. #7
    Registered User 240ZX's Avatar
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    Default Remove the locking bolt!

    After viewing your attachment I noticed that the locking bolt is still in place. This is a tappered bolt that secures the large through shaft from moving. It goes in place from the top. Put a nut back on the locking bolt, so you don't F up the threads, and hammer it until it breaks loose. Of course you will have to remove the nut before the locking bolt can be removed. As mentioned by one of the other guys, pre-soak the assembly with penitrating oil long before you start to hammer. Remember that these assemblies have been sitting for a long time and are tough to remove at best. I replaced the shafts and locking bolts with new ones just for peace of mind. I also used never-seize upon reassembly. Hope this info helps you out.

  8. #8
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    Default

    Thanks guys
    James

    http://www.classiczcars.com/forums/showthread.php?t=11123

  9. #9
    Formerly Datto-Zed Murph's Avatar
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    Default

    I'm gonna have to do this on my zed when I finally get it back. Not looking forward to it. My mechanic said he took 3/4 of a day to remove just one from his 240Z.

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    Talking Something to make the job easier

    Originally posted by Datto-Zed
    I'm gonna have to do this on my zed when I finally get it back. Not looking forward to it. My mechanic said he took 3/4 of a day to remove just one from his 240Z.
    The Thread linked below offers a tool that can make the job a lot easier. The tool is used to draw the pin out without damage. A picture of the tool is provided.

    http://www.classiczcars.com/forums/s...8710#post38710



  11. #11
    Registered User Marty Rogan's Avatar
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    Default Locking Bolt

    Someone said that the locking bolt goes back in from the top? I need a better explanation of how that works. I have new locking bolts. They have a sort of tappered end and threaded on the other. Isn't the "top" inside the transverse link, where the spindle bolt goes through.

    Any help would be appreciated.

    I am ordering one of those spindle pullers. It should be worht every penny if it works as advertised.

    TIA,

    Marty

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Locking Bolt

    Originally posted by Marty Rogan
    Someone said that the locking bolt goes back in from the top? I need a better explanation of how that works. I have new locking bolts. They have a sort of tappered end and threaded on the other. Isn't the "top" inside the transverse link, where the spindle bolt goes through.

    Any help would be appreciated.

    I am ordering one of those spindle pullers. It should be worth every penny if it works as advertised.

    TIA,

    Marty
    In the picture below you can see the "bottom" (threaded part) of the locking bolt protruding downward from the center of the suspension assembly. To remove it you use a hammer to tap it "upward" and it pops out the top of the housing there. Very simple. When installing the new ones, you have to line up a notch in the spindle pin with the hole that the locking pin goes into so that the locking pin can be inserted from the top and on through.

    It's hard to see until you get the assembly out of the car, but the hole for the locking bolt actually goes all the way through the housing there. This job is really fairly easy (except for the act of pulling, or pressing, or cutting out the old spindle pins) as removal of the assembly and re-installation is straightforward.

    Oh, one thing, the the notch in the spindle pin is NOT in the center of the pin, so you have to make sure the pin is installed in the correct orientation so the notch is visable in the hole for the locking bolt.

  13. #13
    Registered User Marty Rogan's Avatar
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    Default Locking bolt

    I think I am getting a clearer picture. Does the locking bolt connect to the slot in the spindle pin at the bottom, or the side of the spindle pin?

    Marty

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    Default Re: Locking Bolt

    Marty, Carl's explanation is very good. Maybe this info will help you out further. The purpose of the locking bolt is to correctly position the spindle in the assembly and to prevent it from rotating when you torque the spindle end nuts. As Carl said, the notch is not in the center of the spindle. Also, orient the flat, of the spidle notch, with the centerline of the locking bolt through hole before installing it. Rotating the spindle, when it's already installed is difficult if not impossible without dorking something up. The tapper on the locking bolt bears against the flat area of the spindle notch. Remember to use some type of anti-seize during assembly. hope this info helps you out.

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Locking bolt

    Originally posted by Marty Rogan
    I think I am getting a clearer picture. Does the locking bolt connect to the slot in the spindle pin at the bottom, or the side of the spindle pin?
    More like on the side. and as 240ZX mentioned, use lots of anti-seize or grease or whatever when re-assembling. The idea is to keep the new spindle and locking pins from being as difficult to remove as the old ones were, if the need ever arises.

  16. #16
    Registered User Marty Rogan's Avatar
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    Default

    Thanks Carl. I've got it now.

    All I need now it the time to do it!!! Probably in June the way its going.

    Marty

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